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BigDaveK

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@David Violante has some excellent advice!

The flavor ingredient is the absolute most important. Personally, when I taste fruit, vegetables, or flowers if I don't say, "Mmm, that good!" then I don't use it for a dedicated wine. Maybe it can be a secondary flavor in a recipe, maybe it can go in a smoothie.

Also, don't use water for topping up. A similar wine, a similar/same fruit juice, even some teas - anything that won't dilute your wine.
 

GretchenR

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There’s a ton of great info people have posted here from their experiences. Use good fruit, and 6-9 pounds per gallon is a good starting point. Freezing the fruit and then thawing it before fermentation can help to break down the cells in the fruit and give your fermentation better access to everything. Pectic enzyme also helps.

Do you have a hydrometer? Add sugar to achieve a specific specific gravity where you want it. That relates to the potential alcohol content after fermentation. I personally like to be around 1.080-1.090. Using a hydrometer takes the guess work out of how much sugar to add (chapatization) based on other ingredients, volume, etc… try not to add water unless you have to...

There’s science and art with all the above. Here’s some more… different yeasts impart different characteristics and also have different requirements and nutritional needs. Know what those are before you use them so that you know how to be most effective and give them what they need to do their work. For example, 71b will eat up some of the acid and may be best for a higher acid fruit. There are a lot of choices. Try some different smaller size ferments of the same fruit with different yeasts to see what happens and what you like. Be sure to add nutrients for them.

Try to have the end in mind before you begin so you know what you need to do to get there. And have fun! And make it the way YOU want it. You’re drinking it! There’s a lot of information in many areas of the forum. Search around to get some answers and different perspectives and experiences. They will help to guide your decision making process. And ask! Looking forward to how your rhubarb progresses!
If you freeze the peaches and then thaw them, do you soak them in lemon juice before freezing to keep them from turning brown, like you do when you freeze peaches for cooking? Or is that not necessary because you aren't freezing them for very long?
 
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If you freeze the peaches and then thaw them, do you soak them in lemon juice before freezing to keep them from turning brown, like you do when you freeze peaches for cooking? Or is that not necessary because you aren't freezing them for very long?
Peaches can brown fast, so I'd follow the preservation recipe for cooking peaches. The time during freezing and thawing may be enough to produce a problem.
 

Rice_Guy

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@GretchenR the raw peaches I freeze seem to survive freezing (halves with out pit). Yes you could do lemon or even Real Lemon or an acidic sanitizer solution. They will tend to brown In spite of it. Browning seems to be from oxygen exposure so fo me the key is to get them mushed/ squeeze the air out when I start a primary.
the factory method is surface treat with steam which also helps pull the skins off. Mom would use a boiling water bath which again helps on the skins.
 

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