Straining the pulp off on the way to the secondary?

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arcticsid

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Okay you have all inspired me(convinced me to make wine with whole fruit) and now again I ask you for your help.

I pitched the yeast on this orange wine on the 6th using Premier Cuvee. Starting SG was 1.090, I just checked it and it is reading .990. Could it have fermented this quick?:confused: WOW, I even tried to look at the hydrometer standing on my head, it said.660:)

So it's time to transfer it and there is alot of pulp. What is the best way to strain this before it goes into the secondary? Do I scoop the cap off into a straining bag and squeeze the juice back into the bucket? And, if I do, when I siphon off the must do I strain this also through a bag first and squeeze again? I don't want to expose it to the air more than I have to.

I'm not sure what I created here, but there is definitely some alcohol in there!!!!! I am afraid to smoke around it!!:D The taste is a little bitter, but I am not alarmed I can back sweeten it later and will probably add some orange extract to enhance the flavor. Other than that I think I am on my way to some sort of success here. The taste isn't to bad, a little yeasty, but I am assuming that is to be expected.

So I am ready to make the transfer. As always, I'd appreciate any advice on what to do next.

Thanks
Troy
 

Luc

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In my opinion you waited a bit to long with transferring to the secondary.
I always do that after maximum a week, and while
the wine is still fermenting.

I strain the pulp through (here we go again :D) a nylon stocking
or I use my bucket sieve:

http://wijnmaker.blogspot.com/2008/03/bouw-een-emmerzeef-building-bucket.html

Sometimes I do even both: strain through the nylon stocking into the bucket sieve.

Then there is the point that normally when the wine is finished the cap sinks to the bottom of the fermenter.
Then it is easy to syphon the wine out of the bucket.....

If the bucket has a valve at the bottom you could drain off the juice.

When you start pressing the pulp I advise not pressing to hard.
Otherwise fine pulp will be pressed through the mazes of the nylon or cheesecloth and will get into the wine, and then it will take longer to clear. it may also impart more bitterness or harshness.

The bitterness may vanish with aging.

Luc
 

arcticsid

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greetings LUC. I waited to long? it has been less than a week. I still question my reading on the 9th at 6pm I had an SG of 1.035, today at 6am I am reading .990. Could it finish that quick? Also because of the way I processed the oranges the pulp is on the top, there was some settling I'm sure, but this looks like corn bread on top, and I followed your recommendation and pushed it down several times a day.

In fact I was thinking don't squeeze at all, the must itself taste okay. I didn't add the pectin enzyme before fermenting, but at this point, I am not concerned about the haze as much as I am concerned about the learning process and the completion of this batch.

If I do indeed find success in this batch there are a couple things I would do different, but we will save that for another discussion.

So, in conclussion, should I just remove and discard the cap and then siphon through a nylon and go from there?

Please advise, sure appreciate your input

Troy

(p.s., my eyes are green, what color nylons should I buy?:)LOL HeeHee:)
 

non-grapenut

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Sounds like your first fruit wine is going great, Troy! Citrus wine must ferments very quickly, and you are correct, the top floating pulp does look just like cornmeal. I use a thick cotton napkin placed in a sieve placed over a 6 cup pitcher. I then use a funnel to place my primary ferment into the carboy. Citrus wines will clear over time, and if not, I have had great success with a bentonite slurry, separating the 5 gallons into 5 individual carboys for easy stirring. Don't worry about the bitterness...if need be, you can always blend this orange with a sweeter wine for a nice surprise!
 

Luc

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Could it finish that quick? Also because of the way I processed the oranges the pulp is on the top, there was some settling I'm sure, but this looks like corn bread on top, and I followed your recommendation and pushed it down several times a day.

In fact I was thinking don't squeeze at all, the must itself taste okay. I didn't add the pectin enzyme before fermenting, but at this point, I am not concerned about the haze as much as I am concerned about the learning process and the completion of this batch.
Indeed a wine can finish that quick.
Normally it takes a bit longer but it is not a thing unheard off.

The bitterness was what I was actually meaning when I told you that I thought it was too long on the lees.
Bitterness mostly is imparted by the solids being to long in the pulp.
But it will mellow out during aging.

Best is indeed not to squeeze to hard when filtering, or if like you say the must tastes ok do not squeeze at all. Syphoning would be the way to go.

Luc

Blue nylons would suit you best ;)
 
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arcticsid

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LUC, I wasn't able to get any pectin enzyme before it was done fermenting, I have some now, should I add it to the secondary, or is it to late for that?

I realize this may be hazy and I can live with that. Is there anything I can do to encourage the clearing and settling at this point?

I also realize this may take a while to "age" and will need to rack a few more times.

How long do you recommend before I transfer it off the secondary?

Thanks
Troy
 

Luc

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You could still add pectic enzymes now.

pectic enzymes do not work in a high alcohol environment, but this is not such an environment.
Pectics are often added after fermentation has finished.
Look at the thread about the dandelion wine somewhere on this forum where pectic enzymes were added for clearing with success after the wine had finished.

Remember that pectics need a fairly warm environment to do their
job best. Room temperature would be fine.

Cold stabilistation, meaning putting the wine out in the cold around freezing temperature might also do the job. That will take some weeks however.

Look here for my experiments with pectic enzymes and you will know when they will work:

http://wijnmaker.blogspot.com/2008/01/avonturen-op-het-pecto-pad-deel-2.html

Maybe you have noticed that I have never commented or posted on any subject regarding fining agents.
That is because I do not use any, ever. I also never filter.
So no advise on these from me regarding this wine.
Time clears all my wines.

Please let the wine first finish completely before you start using the cold or pectic enzymes to clear it.

Luc
 

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