Quantcast

Speeding up the aging process

Wine Making Talk

Help Support Wine Making Talk:

Ajmassa

just a guy
Joined
Oct 25, 2016
Messages
3,872
Reaction score
3,582
Location
S. Jersey/Philadelphia area
Given my ‘less than expert’ knowledge on all that is winemaking, maybe this thought isn’t realistic. But as young wine ages certain things fade, balance, and grow more complex right? Due in part by micro-oxidation I assume.
And when a younger wine airs out it opens up giving us an idea of how it will mature as time passes
So is it a crazy thought to ‘air out’ a batch in bulk before bottling? Maybe splash-racking the hell out of it, or hitting it with a degassing drill?
It sounds logical to me, but I’ve never heard of something like this ever attempted before.
 

Julie

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Dec 4, 2009
Messages
12,054
Reaction score
1,767
I don't know if that would work, my first thought is oxidation. When you are airing out a wine prior to drinking you are drinking it then but airing it out and then bottling to be you are adding oxidation to the bottle.
 

Ajmassa

just a guy
Joined
Oct 25, 2016
Messages
3,872
Reaction score
3,582
Location
S. Jersey/Philadelphia area
I don't know if that would work, my first thought is oxidation. When you are airing out a wine prior to drinking you are drinking it then but airing it out and then bottling to be you are adding oxidation to the bottle.
Not necessarily adding oxidation to the bottle. You’d be opening it up in whatever way, obviously using up a lot of the free so2 in the process, and then hitting it with a proper dose of k-meta right after. And Giving it some time relax in a topped up carboy before bottling.
“Airing it out” in bulk, yet maintaining so2 and headspace.
I could easily do a small trial attempt. And the next batch I bottle, I could do this to a few bottles worth. Maybe 375’s. A few months down the rd popping the cork on each and note the differences.
Oxidation to the point of negatively affecting the wine doesn’t happen immediately. Especially with proper so2 levels.
 

Mismost

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2015
Messages
955
Reaction score
716
I am pretty new myself but when we open a wine and let it breathe, I think what is really happening is it is farting out co2. Yeah even though we degassed , still a bit of co2.

I notice this in commercial wines also.. My thoughts and I've been wrong before.
 

Ajmassa

just a guy
Joined
Oct 25, 2016
Messages
3,872
Reaction score
3,582
Location
S. Jersey/Philadelphia area
I am pretty new myself but when we open a wine and let it breathe, I think what is really happening is it is farting out co2. Yeah even though we degassed , still a bit of co2.

I notice this in commercial wines also.. My thoughts and I've been wrong before.
I wasn’t thinking for a wine so young its still got co2.
For instance- making a batch,grapes/kit whatever, going along with you regular process—Let’s say in bulk for 12 months. And possibly have it it drinking like a 3 or 4 yr old wine in 1.5-2 yrs.
I have been under a different impression than you. With the millions of different aerators on the market, I’ve thought letting it breath wasn’t releasing co2 (maybe a smidge) but mainly introducing oxygen.
 

NorCal

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
Joined
Apr 17, 2014
Messages
3,187
Reaction score
3,321
Location
Sierra Foothills, Nor Cal
Storing the wine at a temperature higher than 55 degrees will also accelerate aging. There is a temperature/aging ch I researched this when I was building my wine box. I came up with a range of 65-69 degrees, which allowed for economic cooling and was a reasonable temperature for wines to be drunk within 3-5 years. https://www.wineperspective.com/how-temperature-affects-wine-aging/
 

balatonwine

The Verecund Vigneron
Joined
May 9, 2017
Messages
974
Reaction score
670
Location
Badacsony wine region. Hungary
Early micro-oxygenation can indeed be used to speed up aging in red wine (but not white wine by the way). But it is a controlled process. Splash racking (which would probably be more like macro-oxygenation) as suggested to introduce oxygen is a very much uncontrolled process which can lead to problems. That is, don't assume that an SO2 molecule in your wine will find all those large influx of O2 molecules you introduced before too many O2 molecules first find and hits another chemicals in your wine, and turns those chemical into something less desirable in too high of rates. Micro-oxygenation is all about finding the right balance. A better discussion on this topic than I could make is available at:

http://www.academicwino.com/2013/01/microoxygenation-quality-preferences.html/

But, in conclusion, I like to experiment. So if you have some wine to commit to try out your idea, no reason why you should not give it a whirl to see if you like the results or not. It is your wine, and you are the master of your cellar. :)
 
Last edited:

Ajmassa

just a guy
Joined
Oct 25, 2016
Messages
3,872
Reaction score
3,582
Location
S. Jersey/Philadelphia area
Well I’m glad I finally put this thought out there since it brought some pretty good discussion. Thank you both for sharing some quality reads.
Great article. With the different chemical changes happening at different rates under diff temps and trying to find that ‘happy medium’ to maximize desireables and minimize undesireables—-it definitely changes my outlook for future storage temps.
Great tip at the end too, something I thought but never knew for sure: storing open wine in the fridge instead of countertop will extend the life 6x to 16x longer. Quality info.
Another fantastic read. And sort of confirms my original thought, but under a much more controlled system. Regulating either 25mL and 50mL micro-oxidation with a “microdue” (whatever that is) sounds pretty high tech and not very realistic for the typical basement dweller.
I wonder how the micro-oxidation amounts from barrel aging compare to those. I bet it’s probably the best way for the home winemaker to introduce o2 in a more controlled way, as opposed to say splash racking or drilling.
It was also interesting to see how the testers preferred the control/25mL/50mL almost 33% each. I can’t help but think the ones who preferred the control generally like easier drinking less bold wines than the others.
 

joeswine

joeswine
Joined
Nov 15, 2007
Messages
7,346
Reaction score
1,424
My. Thoughts are this what ever you do you need structure in your. Wine. splash racking ,is another way to Degas your wine without adding oxygen to the mix.When you decant a wine your allowing the finished product to open up from bottle compression and releassing the aroma and decompressing the structure of the wine.Make sense!
 

balatonwine

The Verecund Vigneron
Joined
May 9, 2017
Messages
974
Reaction score
670
Location
Badacsony wine region. Hungary
I wonder how the micro-oxidation amounts from barrel aging compare to those.
Don't forget a Flextank option. They are made specifically to add some micro-oxidation to the aging wine much like a barrel. Cheaper than a barrel in the long run because they last longer than a barrel (and they are easier to clean and store). Oak of course has to be introduced in other ways.
 

Latest posts

Top