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Julie

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You can but understand the yeast in the slurry would be very stressed and there is a greater chance of a stuck fermentation. Do you know you can take your slurries and freeze them. When I make wine I always take the slurry and throw it in the freezer, this way I always have some on hand.
 

Triton200

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You can but understand the yeast in the slurry would be very stressed and there is a greater chance of a stuck fermentation. Do you know you can take your slurries and freeze them. When I make wine I always take the slurry and throw it in the freezer, this way I always have some on hand.
I did refrigerate it cause I am using it in a couple days of gathering it, I will warm it to room temp, give it a little sugar to get it started and see what happens. Thanks for your input.
 

BernardSmith

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You can but understand the yeast in the slurry would be very stressed and there is a greater chance of a stuck fermentation. Do you know you can take your slurries and freeze them. When I make wine I always take the slurry and throw it in the freezer, this way I always have some on hand.
Hi Julie, This is really interesting. I would have thought that freezing the slurry would significantly damage the yeast cells. Much like freezing fruit to extract the juice, doesn't freezing rupture cell walls? What prevents this happening to yeast? Do you add glycerin or something to protect the cell walls?
 

Julie

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Hi Julie, This is really interesting. I would have thought that freezing the slurry would significantly damage the yeast cells. Much like freezing fruit to extract the juice, doesn't freezing rupture cell walls? What prevents this happening to yeast? Do you add glycerin or something to protect the cell walls?
No it doesn't damage the yeast cells. I have slurries as old as 2 years and when I defrost them, they start right up without any issues.
 

BernardSmith

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Wow! This is great news. I have to try storing some of my slurries in the freezer. I tend to compost them if I have no immediate use for them but if freezing is not a problem...this opens up a whole new approach enabling me to store and reuse select batches of yeast (from the slurry) for my more historical and exotic meads and for my session meads (very little stress on the yeast for the session batches).
 

Julie

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I put them in a canning jar with a id on it, filled to the top.
 

BernardSmith

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Filled? But wouldn't that then expand once frozen and so crack the jars? Is there a reason to fill the jars to the top if they are to be frozen?
 

Julie

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Filled? But wouldn't that then expand once frozen and so crack the jars? Is there a reason to fill the jars to the top if they are to be frozen?
leave about an inch of space and you will be fine.
 

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