Slow fermenting nc-1118

Wine Making Talk

Help Support Wine Making Talk:

orejunky

Member
Joined
Oct 6, 2016
Messages
51
Reaction score
1
Hello everyone. So I started a batch of around 50L of hard cider. The cider is from a proven cider provider that has produced decent cider before (pastuerized, no preservatives). Because of space I am brewing at his place. I made sure everything was sterilized and I used two packets of NC-1118 yeast as that's what the gentleman said would do at my brew supply store. I have never made this much before. I am told that the temperature is 20 degrees but the cider was refrigerated when I pitched the yeast. Is it unusual to have such a slow start? Anywho, just wondering if I just wait and see or add more yeast etc. Just wondering or I might be ok.
 

DiscoStu

Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2017
Messages
33
Reaction score
12
First off damn your metric system. Making me do math before I can even respond. 20 degrees Celsius is fine. The juice was probable just to cold when you added the yeast. When it warms up it should be fine. Probable won't see any real activity until 48 hours from when you added yeast. Because you started at 4 degrees.
 
Last edited:

orejunky

Member
Joined
Oct 6, 2016
Messages
51
Reaction score
1
Hahaha...thanks. that's what I figured but I wanted to get some reassurance.
 

DiscoStu

Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2017
Messages
33
Reaction score
12
I think we all do it. Worry about the batch until it takes off. I started one last night and felt like I did something wrong until about an hour ago.
 

Hoxviii

Junior Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2017
Messages
48
Reaction score
12
I've had batches sit for almost 72 hours before really kicking off in primary because of a cold house, but they always do. Do you wrap your fermenter or anything to keep the temp stable? did you just add yeast or reactivate it first?

If you just added yeast to cool juice and don't have it wrapped, don't fret until 48 hours and don't get really worked up until 72.

But learn the lesson, have everything at room temperature first - you get much more predictable starts.
 

orejunky

Member
Joined
Oct 6, 2016
Messages
51
Reaction score
1
I reactivated first...as per the instructions on the packet. I don't wrap it....should I?
 

bkisel

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2013
Messages
3,681
Reaction score
1,807
I reactivated first...as per the instructions on the packet. I don't wrap it....should I?
I'll wrap or not in order to influence must temperature. Need to be careful though because you can get a 10 deg F increase in temp for a few days just from the yeast doing their thing. I keep a thermometer in my primary in order to monitor temperature.
 

NorCal

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
Joined
Apr 17, 2014
Messages
3,331
Reaction score
3,705
Location
Sierra Foothills, Nor Cal
I reactivated first...as per the instructions on the packet. I don't wrap it....should I?
From the yeast mfg web site. With the cold must, did you achieve the second line?


THE TOTAL REHYDRATION DURATION SHOULD NEVER EXCEED 45 MINUTES

AVOID COLD SHOCKING THE YEAST. THE TEMPERATURE DROP BETWEEN THE MUST TO BE INOCULATED AND THE REHYDRATION MEDIUM SHOULD NEVER BE
>10°C
 

Hoxviii

Junior Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2017
Messages
48
Reaction score
12
I reactivated first...as per the instructions on the packet. I don't wrap it....should I?
You don't have to wrap it if your house is a steady temperature -and- cool enough that you won't overheat your yeast.

The biggest issue was you pitched your yeast into cold must, so your yeast went from 85 or 90 degrees all happy and activating away into 55 degree must.

You wouldn't be happy if someone threw you in a cold shower with no warning, and neither is your yeast!

Are there any signs of fermentation?
 

Sweetiepie

Junior Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2017
Messages
48
Reaction score
29
I am so glad for this thread, because I just started my first batch of wine and my must was about 62 when I put the yeast in and I haven't seen any sign either but it's only been 36 hours and I guessed it was the temp. I admit I am a little confused because I read from the More Wine site that a slow warm up allows water soluble compounds in the must such as anthocyanins and agreeable tannins extras time to become fully extracted improving the final wine. Honestly I picked the warmest, constant temperature area of my house.

It seemed more concerned with high temps than low, maybe I can put a heating pad under it.
 

bkisel

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2013
Messages
3,681
Reaction score
1,807
IMHO, must at something like 72-78F is a good temperature for yeast to be pitched whether dry or re-hydrated.
 

NorCal

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
Joined
Apr 17, 2014
Messages
3,331
Reaction score
3,705
Location
Sierra Foothills, Nor Cal
I am so glad for this thread, because I just started my first batch of wine and my must was about 62 when I put the yeast in and I haven't seen any sign either but it's only been 36 hours and I guessed it was the temp. I admit I am a little confused because I read from the More Wine site that a slow warm up allows water soluble compounds in the must such as anthocyanins and agreeable tannins extras time to become fully extracted improving the final wine. Honestly I picked the warmest, constant temperature area of my house.

It seemed more concerned with high temps than low, maybe I can put a heating pad under it.
Like most all answers in wine making and poker, the answer is "it depends".

A nice slow ferment, is good, as long as your fruit is in good shape. Grape juice provides an excellent environment for micro organisms to grow, including bacteria that will spoil the wine. A common "fine wine" process is to cold soak the fruit in an inert atmosphere to do exactly what was noted, get good extraction of flavor and color, without extracting the harsh tannins. Later in fermentation, the higher level of alcohol acts as a solvent on the seeds, extracting the astringent tannins from the seeds and stems, so many believe contact time with the skins early in the ferment will get the most out of the wine.

Bottom line know and monitor your must. If it is in good shape, but slow, nothing to worry about. If the fruit showed signs of damage, contamination, mold etc, I would want to get things going fast and have my yeast population dominate the must, consuming the food as fast as possible, without exceeding the safe temps of the yeast.
 
Top