Simple Wine Storage Question.

Wine Making Talk

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taallman

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I am currently making a batch of wine and have always just drank it after i make it. Soon i will be getting married and was thinking I will take a bottle and save it for 20 years for our anniversary. I wanted to know if it was a good idea to place my bottle in a pvc pipe capped on both sides and burry it 4 feet in the ground underneath of a boulder with a marker under it of some sort. Any cons to this idea that anyone might have would be much appreciated because i can't see any.. Dark 50-55 all year round.. unmoving. lemme know what you all think.
 

surlees

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Taallman,
Great idea and congratulations on your getting married. There's a few potential problems you should be aware of before you try this. First, you're going to need to start with a very robust red wine, then you're going to need to age it a very long time in bulk, i.e. carboy, then you're going to need to have lots of tannin, i.e. oak, then you're going to need to have premium (flor) grade natural corks, then you're going to need to start with a relatively low pH, high TA for longterm preservation, and then you're going to need to dose it with a relatively high SO2 level. The idea of burying in the ground is a good one as long as it's below the frost/freeze line and at a constant ~55F and 60-70% hunidity. If the container leaks, your corks will rot before 20 years.

Bottom line, in all likelihood, especially as a beginner, you're not going to be able to replicate the conditions I've described. I suggest you try for something in the 3-5 year range instead. You'll still need to use a robust red, good quality corks, and good technique to achieve this.

Good luck.

Fred
 

Green Mountains

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Surlees makes great points here. Assuming all of his reasoning is correct (certainly not challenging it) it shows why some wines are only fit to drink when they are very old.

The wines that our average wine maker is going to make is relatively balanced and ready for drinking fairly soon after bottling (a few months to a year or so). A wine suitable for drinking in 20 years would probably be less than enjoyable for the first 15 years or so.

I'm thinking 20 years down the line my wine might be more suitable to be mixed with oil and used as a dressing.
 

Larryh86GT

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I am currently making a batch of wine and have always just drank it after i make it. Soon i will be getting married and was thinking I will take a bottle and save it for 20 years for our anniversary. I wanted to know if it was a good idea to place my bottle in a pvc pipe capped on both sides and burry it 4 feet in the ground underneath of a boulder with a marker under it of some sort. Any cons to this idea that anyone might have would be much appreciated because i can't see any.. Dark 50-55 all year round.. unmoving. lemme know what you all think.
It's a wonderful idea but you should be concentrating on making your marriage last 20 years instead of your wine. :D
Larry
(41 years of marriage, now I am concentrating on the wine)
 

rawlus

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99% of all commercial wine is intended to be consumed shortly after purchase. the stars really need to align just right to produce a wine that can improve with 20 years of age.
 

vvolf34

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Larry,

Thats about the best advice I have read.
 

djrockinsteve

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Or.............he could use Wade's tim machine, go back in time, grab a bottle then zip back to the future.
 

JohnT

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If I gather this correctly, you plan on, perhaps, using a schedule 40 PVC pipe that is capped on both ends?

PVC may impart florocarbons into the wine after all that time. The amount should be very minor, but you need to ask yourself .. "how many times do you see wine aging in placstic?". There is a reason!

My suggestion is go ahead an bottle the wine, Use the 1.5 liter bottles to allow for a larger wine to air pocket ratio. Then purchase a "wine Fridge". They are cheap (from $100 - $350), but allow for perfect bottle aging conditions (55f @ 70%hum). This would have a far better chance of success.

Good luck on your wedding!

johnT.
 
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