Should I restart elderflower batch?

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LucindaP

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I started my elderflower wine batch just before Thanksgiving...dumb timing!! I transferred it to the large glass bottle to let it sit for 6 weeks...well.. it is still there. Is it safe to move on with the process by putting in bottles or should I dump it and start over? Thanks!!!
 

mikewatkins727

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Don't dump it. What was the starting S.G. and what is the S.G. now? How many gallons? Any yeast deposit in the bottom of the carboy?
 

LucindaP

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Not sure what the start was....now I believe it 0.999, it is 5 gallons, and there seems to be sediment on the bottom
 

mikewatkins727

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The deposit on the bottom is most likely dead yeast at this point. It sounds like you are still on target. At this point you need to add a healthy dose of patience. I personally would not put it into bottles for at least 6 months. I made a gallon batch almost 2 years ago. Have one bottle left, it get better as time marches on.
 

BernardSmith

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The deposit on the bottom is most likely dead yeast at this point. It sounds like you are still on target. At this point you need to add a healthy dose of patience. I personally would not put it into bottles for at least 6 months. I made a gallon batch almost 2 years ago. Have one bottle left, it get better as time marches on.
I agree that this looks to be "on target" but two quick thoughts: Elderflower wine IMO, wants to have some residual sweetness. A final gravity below 1.000 is perhaps a tad too dry for this wine. I think LucindaP should taste the wine and see how close to "target" it might be. I say this as someone who makes elderflower wine at least once a year.

My second thought is that the thing about elderflower wine is that it is a very traditional folk wine in Britain, and in Britain it is made to be drunk before it has finished fermenting (so it is still somewhat sweet) and is made to be drunk sparkling. In fact, the folk version is often "over-carbonated" because it is bottled so early. Now, I prefer my elderflower wine less "folkish", but my point is that aging this wine is not necessary. But again, I urge LucindaP to taste her wine and see if really is ready to bottle or if it is too hot (too much alcohol) or has off flavors because of stressed yeast or other factors...
 
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Julie

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Besides what has already be advised I would just suggest, no matter what wine you are making you should always notate what the beginning gravity reading is.
 
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