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Should I allow juce to rest before adding yeast?

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arcticsid

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Was just looking at a recipe that uses frozen grape juice concentrate. It suggested mixing the reconstituted juice with enough sugar for a desired SG, and then letting it rest 12 hrs. before pitching the yeast. Is there anything to be said about that? Also, when the yeast is added, is there an ideal temperature for the juice to be when adding the yeast?

Thanks
Troy
 

Wade E

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Start with an sg of 1.085. The best way to do a frozen concentrate is to use 3-3 1/2 cans per gallon and wait 12 hours to make sure that the sulfite has some time to weaken then add pectic enzyme to break up any pectins in there so you dont get a pectin haze in your wine and then wait another 12 hours and add your yeast to your mustwhich should have a of temp of around 74*. The best way to add yeats is to make a yeast starter or at least reconstitute the yeast by following the instructions on the packet of yeast. That being said I usually do the sprikle on method and have never had a problem.
 

arcticsid

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Actually starting with SG1.10Gonna use champagne yeast. Recipe soon. Rganks for the resting advice.
Troy
 

oldwino

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74 is a pretty good temp to ferment at. No problem there. However, many wine makers have wine that doesn't clear very well or not at all. They use everkleer later etc. That is because pectic enzyme is no longer viable at 75 and above. If you plan on fermenting at higher temps you may want to consider using bentonite or the everkleer products. Most home thermometers are a couple of degrees off. I ferment at 68 degrees for that reason. That is a personal choice. Secondary carboy to finish fermentation is recommended at lower temps so I pick somewhere between the two.
 
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petes

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Bentonite?

oldwino, I've seen references to bentonite being included in primary ferments.
Is that what you're indicating? Or are/do you use it as a fining agent at conclusion of your secondary?
Never been able to get a handle on its use at the primary end of things; used it prior bottling . Followed close as can Jack Keller's advice but not satisfied with results. And the more accepted fining agents you have over there are somewhat thin on the ground here.
Apologies if I've got somewhat OT here :)
 

oldwino

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In the primary. If you do use it use a slurry mix first otherwise it will be a mud ball as you add it. I draw out a few ounces of wine and get it well mixed before re-adding to the wine.
 

oldwino

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One thing about clearing I have noticed. For years before I added tannin to all my wine I noticed that my wines aged on oak were much clearer than the wines not aged on oak. I had thought that the oak was soaking up the garbage. Actually I found out the tannin not only makes wine keep longer, improves flavor, and also helps the clearing of the end product. It wasn't the oak, it was the tannin in the oak. I now add tannin to all of my wines.
 

oldwino

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There are as many ways to make wine as their are wine makers. The wine still turns out OK. I just prefer pectic enzyme or bentonite. I was just pointing out that pectic enzyme is not very viable above 75 degrees. If you do use it above 75 and the wine doesn't clear as well as it should it is not the product, it is the temp. Jack Keller is pretty much the authority on wine making but I don't follow all of his advise either. I think you have to take everything you hear with a grain of salt, so to speak. I ferment at 68 to 70 degrees. Pectic enzyme or bentonite works for me. I add it to the primary. I have taken wine out of my wine cooler (59 degrees) after 3 years and it is still clear and still tastes good. I have never used those special fining agents. I age my wine for about 8 months.

No apologies needed.
 

petes

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Thanks oldwino.

Something to think about there re bentonite. Don't consider will have a problem with over temp and pectic enzyme; always use this as it seems a good insurance and even if not needed doesn't hurt the end result?
Always ready to listen to a contrary opinion tho :D

As to bentonite, any experience of it stripping colour and/or flavour as understand it's easy to overuse?
Have read reports of 'organic' producers using it to mask insecticide/pesticide cheating. :eek:
 

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