Quantcast

Should I adjust high pH/low acidity?

Wine Making Talk

Help Support Wine Making Talk:

Hic

Junior
Joined
Nov 13, 2020
Messages
2
Reaction score
1
I recently started my first wine - a Hawthorn wine. The recipe included the juice of two oranges.

After the primary fermentation I kept a small amount of liquid to measure the acidity, which I have now down following How To Take An Acid Test With A ph Meter

I have a pH of 3.9 and TA of 3.6%.

Should I be looking to increase the acidity when I rack the wine? Or even should I do it straight away while it is still in secondary fermentation?
 

salcoco

Veteran Wine Maker
WMT Supporter
Joined
Jan 1, 2007
Messages
2,916
Reaction score
1,218
Location
Kansas
wait until wine finishes fermentation and clears. measurement made during fermentation are not accurate as wine can devlop carbonic acid from the co2 skewing the reading. I suggest bench test along with tasting to adjust acid at that point.
 

Rice_Guy

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2014
Messages
1,330
Reaction score
977
Location
Midwest
Normal is a pH under 3.5, I also do country wines which have more oxidation risk so I target pH 3.2 to 3.3 (more acid is more stable)
Normal is to adjust pH before primary since it is easier to get a good reading. After primary we have CO2 in the system which will lower the reading and make adjustment harder. ,,,, opinion: it is worth adding more acid but I can’t give you a number on how to compensate for CO2.

The TA is involved in the finished wine flavor, for country wine the normal is to put it between 0.6 to 0.75% (translation up to 7.5 grams per liter,,, your 3.6% would be like drinking straight Real lemon juice so I will guess one decimal point makes 3.6 grams per liter). next is how sweet do you want the finished wine? more TA means the finished wine balances with more residual sugar.
two years ago I made a really out of balance mulberry, ,, since then I have designed TA to fit the sweetness I like on finished wine.View attachment 68474
commercial sodas, teas, juice boxes, cider, etc also will produce a sloped line, but shifted to the left. ,,, a guess is that 10 to 14% alcohol has an innate sweetness ,,, wines from others, are in this data set
 

Latest posts

Top