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WineXpert Sediment, clarifying & degassing.

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Gwand

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And I will tell you for a stone cold fact that kits will clear just fine at a much lower temp than that. I just bottled a Winexpert Sauv Blanc that I had done completely in my basement. It never gets above 62 down there after October. I never use heating belts, ever and I have a pear going down there right now. Quite happily.

Just my $0.02.
I agree with you. Today I tasted my WE eclipse Savignon Blanc that has been both aging for three months in my basement at around 60°F. I followed kit directions precisely since I am a newbie. The wine is crystal clear. And at three months it tastes pretty darn good.
 

Elmer

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Jut completed #4 in the directions.
I racked and topped up.
The wine was clear, but much darker than any Pinot I have encountered.

I had removed the brew belt and blankets last week and let the wine get down to the basement temp of 62.

The wine itself is drinkable, but young.
I am going o age it for 3 months before bottling.
Considering throwing some (1) oak spiral in during the bulk aging
 

Elmer

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Down in basement/laundry room doing laundry took a look at my carboy 1 day after racking.

There is a ton of lees/ sediment on the bottom as well as in the ribs of the carboy. Thinking I must have racked some up.
But I am sure the temp drop helped with clearing.
I am just astounded with the amount of sediment in this kit!
 
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I know you are going crazy, cause u hate lees as much as me..
just thank of the burning the lees dance outside, and melt your driveway at the same time.....
stay warm my friend
 

Kozzie

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And I will tell you for a stone cold fact that kits will clear just fine at a much lower temp than that. I just bottled a Winexpert Sauv Blanc that I had done completely in my basement. It never gets above 62 down there after October. I never use heating belts, ever and I have a pear going down there right now. Quite happily.

Just my $0.02.
Excellent advice. I have a valpolicella going, degassed and added chitosan last week. Today I went to check its clarity thinking I'd be bottling it. Not even close. Very cloudy. I've been keeping near our woodstove to keep it around 70. Think I'll move it to a cooler spot which would get it to about 65 and wait.
 

Tipsy

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For those of you who have a cold basement. This is what we do.
we have a tent set up, with benches for the carboys and we have a temp controlled oil filled heater set up to keep the temp constantly warm. When we want the room cooler to age we just turn the heater off and it cools down. This has worked great for us. Also keeps all our equipment in one place. We can make 8 batches at a time in there.
 

Kozzie

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I had a WE kit for Valpolicella and it said I should be able to bottle after one week. No way. completely cloudy and full of sediment. I moved it from near the woodstove to the dining room which is much cooler and checked it weekly. Today, three weeks later it is almost clear. Really pretty burgundy. I'll leave it another week or two. So happy you all teach patience!
 

winemaker81

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Adding to @cmason1957's advice, a warm temperature is important only during fermentation. The colder it is, the slower the yeast eat. My cellar is typically 58 F in December, January, and February and that's where my wines rest. That said, I have fermented whites at 58 F, which lasted 3+ weeks. If you're a beginner, target 70 to 80 F, until you become comfortable with the wine making process.

Colder temperatures aid in clearing, as the saturation point of all materials in the wine reduces as the temperature drops. The lower the saturation point, the more solids will drop. There is a recent thread on cold stabilization/crashing, that offers more detailed information regarding temperature, although that is geared towards tartaric acid. Search for "cold stabilization".

Most (maybe all?) of the fining agents cause the suspended particles to clump together. As the clumps get heavier with size, they drop lower in the wine, until they settle. Stirring the sediment back into suspension provides more raw material for clumping, so the process occurs faster. As long as the directions for the fining agent(s) are followed, they will work. Stirring the sediment means it works faster.

And as others have mentioned, do nothing and the wine usually clears anyway. Kits use fining agents as 99.9% of beginners want the wine in the bottle so they can drink. Experienced wine makers want the same exact thing, but most of us have learned patience.

:db
 
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