Satsuma Wine

Discussion in 'General Wine Making Forum' started by Cowboy77, Jan 23, 2019.

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  1. Jan 23, 2019 #1

    Cowboy77

    Cowboy77

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    I have about 3 1/2 gallons of satsuma juice in the freezer that I pressed from fresh satsumas back in the fall and want to make wine out of. Have a few questions that I hope you all can help me with. 1-Are there any issues with making a wine from citrus juice, such as getting fermentation started, stalled fermentation, or any other issues I should be aware of when making a citrus wine? 2-What yeast would you all recommend for satsuma wine (or any citrus wine)? 3-Are there any other issues with making a citrus wine that I should know about (advice/recommendations you all have on making wine from citrus juice)? Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Jan 23, 2019 #2

    FTC Wines

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    I have no knowledge to help you. But being from the Satsuma area of Florida I’m very interested. Keep. Us posted. Thanks, Roy
     
  3. Jan 24, 2019 #3

    Stressbaby

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  4. Jan 30, 2019 #4

    MJD

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    I’ve made orange, lemon, and grapefruit wine. All turned out excellent....after aging a year.

    I made these in the early stages of my wine hobby and allowed all to ferment “hot”. My notes are not with me, but it was allowed to ferment without any cooling to lower the temp.

    The finished product was quite volatile, jet-fuelish, and I had a number of remarkable adjectives in my notes to describe the taste, if memory serves. The beautiful taste after one year was a bit of a surprise to me, given the early experience.

    Use any number of white wine years (K1, Champagne, have always been top performers for me), try to keep your fermentation temps low (aim for less than 70 degrees, and lower if you can), keep the alcohol to 12-13%, add nutrients per usual, and you’re good to go.
     

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