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Saignee Volume to Remove

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Kitchen

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Hello All, I have 4 lugs of Cab Sav and 1 lug of Merlot grapes coming in tomorrow for a blend I plan on starting this weekend. I would like to make a bold full bodied wine and plan on bleeding some of the juice off after 24 hours of cold soak (along with 24 more hours afterwards, and fermenting at 86F). I am wondering how much juice I should remove. I have read 10% is ideal, but 10% of what, total must or the amount of total finished wine? I was thinking about 1.5 gallons; would that be an appropriate amount?

Ideally, I would like to end up with (finished) 6 gallons of free run and 3 gallons of pressed wine from this batch, along with some Saignee Rose.
 
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stickman

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Draining 10% would normally mean 10% of the total estimated juice yield. Juice yield is always somewhat variable, but draining 1.5gal is probably reasonable.
 

Kitchen

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Thanks for the advice. Looks like I will drain 1.25 to 1.5 gallons of juice for a nice rose in the summer.
 

Ajmassa

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Yep 10% seems like the safe range to not overdose on tannin they say. especially if using enzymes. First attempt was in May on a Malbec. Did about 15% equivalent and very happy so far with both resulting wines.
Planning about 10% saigneé this season on a cab.

one suggestion- Be careful on that 24hours. I pulled mine immediately after crushing, and was already plenty dark enough. Just the time it took to crush and press did the trick. Will be repeating that this season. If too light I can always easily darken, but lightening isn’t exactly an option.
 

BernardSmith

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Yep 10% seems like the safe range to not overdose on tannin they say. especially if using enzymes. First attempt was in May on a Malbec. Did about 15% equivalent and very happy so far with both resulting wines.
Planning about 10% saigneé this season on a cab.

one suggestion- Be careful on that 24hours. I pulled mine immediately after crushing, and was already plenty dark enough. Just the time it took to crush and press did the trick. Will be repeating that this season. If too light I can always easily darken, but lightening isn’t exactly an option.
What is the issue with the color? If the saignee is too dark does that mean that it has already extracted too much of the tannins and other compounds from the skins and seeds that you are trying to heap onto the must remaining after you have removed the 10- 15%?
 

Ajmassa

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What is the issue with the color? If the saignee is too dark does that mean that it has already extracted too much of the tannins and other compounds from the skins and seeds that you are trying to heap onto the must remaining after you have removed the 10- 15%?
No no. Just meant about the resulting rosé. Saigneé for dual purpose- and to make sure the light rosé color desired is achieved. Some grapes will darken that juice up a lot quicker than others.
 

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