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Rotten-Egg Smell in Primary

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hector

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Hi there !

I began to make a 2-Gallon-Batch of red Wine 2 days ago from Grape Juice .

Fermentation is running with a good speed in the Primary from last night .

Today , as I checked it , I noticed some kind of rotten-egg smell .

I added 50 ppm SO2 at the beginning and I sanitized always all the Equipments .

What is the cause of this smell ?

What should I do to get rid of it , if it's possible ?

Hector
 

Leanne

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Can you give us a run down on how you started this wine? What did you put in to it? What was the starting sg? Let's see if we can help you.
 

hector

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It's a 2-Gallon-Batch of red Wine made from Grape Juice (bought from store) .

It's written on the Packs :

Ingredients : Red Grape Juice concentrate , Water

Free of Preservatives

S.G. of the Juice was 1.060 . I added Invert Sugar to bring the S.G. to 1.090 then

added Yeast Nutrient and 50 ppm SO2 .

After 12 Hours I added Pectinase , checked the pH ( it was 3.3 ) then added enough Tartaric acid

to bring the pH down to 3.0 and after 12 Hours I added Activated Dry Yeast .

Today ( the 2nd Day ) , I noticed the Hydrogen Sulfide smell .

Hector
 

Wade E

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Its veryearly and H2S problems very rarely start at this point cause its usually from a struggling fermentation and as you described its not struggling. Some differnt wines will just smell way different. If you feel that you truly have an H2S problem then stir your wine for a few minutes with a cleaned Copper pipe or some electrical wire and splash rack it but like I said this is way too early for ths to usually occur.
 

Rock

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We had this happen to us with a too quick of a ferment.It went away after alot of splash racking.The wine turned out fine.
 

hector

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Its veryearly and H2S problems very rarely start at this point cause its usually from a struggling fermentation and as you described its not struggling. Some differnt wines will just smell way different. If you feel that you truly have an H2S problem then stir your wine for a few minutes with a cleaned Copper pipe or some electrical wire and splash rack it but like I said this is way too early for ths to usually occur.
Thanks Wade ,

I'm sure it's Hydrogen Sulfide .

I racked it vigorously 3 times during the last 2 Hours , but I smell it yet .

Sometime ago I dissolved 1 Tblspoon Table Sugar into one glass of Water and poured it into a

small yoghurt bucket and added a small amount of Dried Yeast and put the lid on .

After 1 Hour , as I checked it , I noticed the Rotten-Egg smell from it !!!

As I said , I used invert Sugar in my Wine batch . In fact , I used 2 parts table sugar mixed with 1 part water

and a small amount of Citric acid and made it warm ( didn't let it boil ) for 30 minutes .

After cooling to Room Temperature , I added it to the Must .

And now , it's the same Story !!!

Can this smell be because of any reaction between the sugar and the Yeast ?!

Hector
 

gregmg

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I've seen H2S earlier in a fermentation like this, and I think it may be caused by starting with too much SO2 or by the fermentation being too vigorous. Pasteurized juice or juice concentrate is normally treated with sulphites. When you added SO2 at the start you may have created an environment that was uncomfortable for the yeast. Some yeasts are more prone to problems than others. I stopped using Montrachet a long time ago because it creates H2S more often than not. Since fermentation is ongoing, aeration is the single best answer, but an addition of OptiRED might also be advisable. Slowing the fermentation down by reducing the temperature might also help, as would stirring with copper. Although your problems are not likely due to nutrition, if the fermentation has a way to go, a small addition of nutrient might also be advisable.
 
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Wade E

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Please only use the Copper sulfate addition as a last resort if you decide to use that as it is a poison, I know you have not mentioned it as of yet and either has anyone else and thats most likely due to the reason I just stated, it will solve this problem but like I said it is a poison and that dosage if not properly addded correctly can do hrm quickly. I use Montrachet yeast all the time but I also use both nutrient and energizer all the time to make sure there is sufficient nutrition and have never come across ant issues with any of my wines ever.
 

hector

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I've seen H2S earlier in a fermentation like this, and I think it may be caused by starting with too much SO2 or by the fermentation being too vigorous. Pasteurized juice or juice concentrate is normally treated with sulphites. When you added SO2 at the start you may have created an environment that was uncomfortable for the yeast. Some yeasts are more prone to problems than others. I stopped using Montrachet a long time ago because it creates H2S more often than not. Since fermentation is ongoing, aeration is the single best answer, but an addition of OptiRED might also be advisable. Slowing the fermentation down by reducing the temperature might also help, as would stirring with copper. Although your problems are not likely due to nutrition, if the fermentation has a way to go, a small addition of nutrient might also be advisable.
Should I add a little SO2 after aeration , if there is no H2S smell after several splashings .

Hector
 

Manimal

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Don't add any more SO2 until fermentation is complete. As Greg mentioned, too much sulphur present during fermentation can lead to further H2S problems. Also, I would never add SO2 to must prior to fermentation unless you are starting from fresh grapes/fruit or freshly pressed juice that hasn't yet seen any SO2 additions. The whole point of adding it prior to fermentation is to inhibit wild yeasts and bacteria so that the cultured wine yeast you are adding can dominate the fermentation without significant competition. The yeast and bacteria cell count in concentrates and pasteurized juices would be low enough that your cultured yeast will not face much competition from indigenous microbes.
 

hector

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After 24 Hours of smelling H2S and racking vigorously several times , it still emits Hydrogen Sulfide ! :(

I haven't checked the S.G. today , but if checking shows that it

should be transferred to the Secondary , what should I do then ?!

Should I leave it in the Primary longer and wait ?!

I should have told before that the Yeast I used was Baker's Yeast and as I said before , sometime ago

I made a mixture of table sugar , water and baker's Yeast and after 1 Hour it smelled vigorously of H2S .

And now , the same story !

Is that because of any reaction between the sugar and the Yeast ?!

Hector
 

namratasnv

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We had this happen to us with a too quick of a ferment.It went away after alot of splash racking.The wine turned out fine.
The same stuff happened with my wine too but after a splash racking my wine gets fine and now I am not getting any problem with it as it happens in initial level but after that it turns out to be fine.

Thanks
 

gregmg

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I should have told before that the Yeast I used was Baker's Yeast and as I said before , sometime ago

I made a mixture of table sugar , water and baker's Yeast and after 1 Hour it smelled vigorously of H2S .

And now , the same story !

Is that because of any reaction between the sugar and the Yeast ?!
I've used Baker's yeast (Quick Rising Bread Yeast) for ciders before without any problems, but if you're getting H2S then perhaps you should switch to a regular wine yeast.

It's not that there's some sort of chemical reaction between the yeast and sugar. What's happening is the yeast is cracking the sugar molecules for energy and producing alcohol, CO2, and just a little bit of H2S as byproducts. The H2S suggests that the yeast is unhappy with the arrangement. You'll probably have better luck with a wine yeast.

.
 

hector

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I've used Baker's yeast (Quick Rising Bread Yeast) for ciders before without any problems, but if you're getting H2S then perhaps you should switch to a regular wine yeast.

It's not that there's some sort of chemical reaction between the yeast and sugar. What's happening is the yeast is cracking the sugar molecules for energy and producing alcohol, CO2, and just a little bit of H2S as byproducts. The H2S suggests that the yeast is unhappy with the arrangement. You'll probably have better luck with a wine yeast.

.
A little bit of H2S as Byproduct ?!!!!!!

It goes on and on and on , producing H2S and it doesn't seem to be likely to stop .

I'm very upset !

I was very interested in making Wine at Home and bought various ingredients

and Chemicals and that was NOT easy for me .

Bread Yeast is the only Yeast available to buy here in the Shops .

Hector
 

gregmg

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A little bit of H2S as Byproduct ?!!!!!!

It goes on and on and on , producing H2S and it doesn't seem to be likely to stop .

I'm very upset !

I was very interested in making Wine at Home and bought various ingredients

and Chemicals and that was NOT easy for me .

Bread Yeast is the only Yeast available to buy here in the Shops .

Hector
Is this your first batch ever? While it's important to take care of an H2S problem as early as possible, I'm wondering if you're interpreting the normal smells of fermentation as a normal H2S problem. Some H2S will blow off as the fermentation finishes. While aggressive treatment is prudent, the situation may not be as bad as you think.

Where in the world are you that you cannot access wine yeast? Can't you order it? Many online suppliers will ship internationally.
 

hector

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Is this your first batch ever? While it's important to take care of an H2S problem as early as possible, I'm wondering if you're interpreting the normal smells of fermentation as a normal H2S problem. Some H2S will blow off as the fermentation finishes. While aggressive treatment is prudent, the situation may not be as bad as you think.

Where in the world are you that you cannot access wine yeast? Can't you order it? Many online suppliers will ship internationally.
Yes . This is ( OR could be ) my first Batch of Wine .

Do you mean that I should do something aggressively with the Batch ?!

I'm sure it's Hydrogen Sulfide . I racked it vigorously many times since yesterday , but it's emitting H2S NON STOP !

I live in the Middle East and I can't order such things online because it's against the Law here

and the Post won't bring it to me . :(

I bought the Chemicals from an agent that acts as the distributor of a German Chemical Company in my Country .

Hector
 

Wade E

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Im betting this is not H2S myself cause it reallydoesnt happen that often at all. Lots of fermentations really stink to some people while others like it. Im willing to bet your 1 of the people that really just dont like the smell of a fermentation. Id leave it alone and let it finish up as is and when its done fermenting (check sg 3 days in a row and get the same sg) then add the sulfite and sorbate and let it clear. Im betting thios wine will be just fine!
 

gregmg

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You're already doing practically everything I would. The only real difference is that I would add OptiRED. Since you don't have easy access to home wine making supplies, I doubt you'll be able to find it in a time frame that would be helpful.

My advice... Don't worry, be happy! It'll either turn out fine in the end and you'll enjoy some good wine, or it won't and it will be a good learning experience.
 

hector

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Im betting this is not H2S myself cause it reallydoesnt happen that often at all. Lots of fermentations really stink to some people while others like it. Im willing to bet your 1 of the people that really just dont like the smell of a fermentation. Id leave it alone and let it finish up as is and when its done fermenting (check sg 3 days in a row and get the same sg) then add the sulfite and sorbate and let it clear. Im betting thios wine will be just fine!
I'm 100% sure that it's Hydrogen Sulfide .

I'm familiar with such Odours because I studied Chemistry at University
and I can notice the difference between H2S and Alcohol smells .

Hector
 

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