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zadvocate

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I was thinking of taking a Chardonnay juice bucket and adding half a lug of petite Syrah. Thoughts? Would another white varietal the better? I have never made a white wine juice bucket.
 

JohnT

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I was thinking of taking a Chardonnay juice bucket and adding half a lug of petite Syrah. Thoughts? Would another white varietal the better? I have never made a white wine juice bucket.
If you are going for a more typical rose, Chardonnay tends to run dry and tannic. I would go with a softer white juice (like a Riesling).
 
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Will someone clarify a question for me? I'm trying to learn how to make a Rose. Seems it is simply the first run pressed juice fermented without any pulp or skin. Grape choice will vary. Then what is the difference from buying a bucket of juice? Perhaps a Pinot, or a Reisling as John recommends. I was thinking of trying a Sauvignon Blanc and adding a bag of saved frozen Shirah skins for a few hours during initial ferment. The boss prefers a Cote de Provence. better if if will stand up to an summer ice cube. Thoughts? thanks.
 

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usually pressing a red grape after crushing and sustaining contact with the grapes from 4 to 24 hours then pressing. time variance is based on grape color extraction success. others take there standard grape crush for a red wine wait some amount of time and remove some of the juice which would be a Rose. in this manner they change the ratio of liquid to skins in the red wine must looking for better color and body. ferment the rose in either case as you would a white wine. the third way is just find a white and red wine you enjoy. blend the red wine with the white to the color you desire and taste.
 
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Thanks Salcoco. Think I get it. But then the question is if color and tannin is from the skins, what is regular pail juice? Just bought several paiIs of various California reds. No must, but quite red juice. Should the juice without skins not be light? Somehow extracted at crushing by the manufacturer?

Any downside to adding a few handfuls of Shirah skins that still have good color to a pail of Shirah? Skins were bagged and frozen after last season
 

salcoco

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juice bucket come from a longer contact with the skin helped along with pectic enzyme and other additives. adding skins from another source to a juice bucket makes good sense since the juice bucket will be short on tannin
 
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So the juice pail makers are adding enzymes to get the color? Thawed and sulfited last spring's Shirah skins. they still have good color. Juice was only 1.082, so I boosted it to 1.09. Added a tsp of DAP per bucket to help with the extra sugar. All is percolating well
 

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So the juice pail makers are adding enzymes to get the color? Thawed and sulfited last spring's Shirah skins. they still have good color. Juice was only 1.082, so I boosted it to 1.09. Added a tsp of DAP per bucket to help with the extra sugar. All is percolating well
Rosé seems mainly to be a byproduct of improving the base wine. But also like right now now with the Cali fires rosé can be a way to salvage tainted grapes that would otherwise be noticeable if made into a bold red wine.
Also have done a rosé kit— it was a Sauvignon Blanc base with a small amount of red juice added for color.

The way you are doing it (white juice fermented with red skins) is the first time I’ve seen it done this way. I think is awesome. Much more interesting than simply adding red juice. Be sure to post about the results.

I think different juice companies have different processes for color extraction. My supplier uses a version of the high heat technique called Flash Detente, I think* (based off the description and machinery in the photos). The description from their website:

Juice Cellar


In our Juice Cellar, freshly pressed grape juice is blended and balanced by our in-house enologist before it is stored in one of these strictly regulated, computerized refrigeration tanks. Each tank is monitored by the computer to assure optimum temperature, maintaining the integrity of flavor and essence in each juice. Pailing is done in two conveyor lines, each with an electronic filler which measures the volume of each pail, ensuring consistency and accuracy of fill. The use of this dual line system allows us to package juice quickly, maintaining optimum temperature. Sanitation in the Juice Cellar, as in our other locals, is a top priority and is subject to our regular inspections.
 
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Rosé seems mainly to be a byproduct of improving the base wine. But also like right now now with the Cali fires rosé can be a way to salvage tainted grapes that would otherwise be noticeable if made into a bold red wine.
Also have done a rosé kit— it was a Sauvignon Blanc base with a small amount of red juice added for color.

The way you are doing it (white juice fermented with red skins) is the first time I’ve seen it done this way. I think is awesome. Much more interesting than simply adding red juice. Be sure to post about the results.

I think different juice companies have different processes for color extraction. My supplier uses a version of the high heat technique called Flash Detente, I think* (based off the description and machinery in the photos). The description from their website:

Juice Cellar

In our Juice Cellar, freshly pressed grape juice is blended and balanced by our in-house enologist before it is stored in one of these strictly regulated, computerized refrigeration tanks. Each tank is monitored by the computer to assure optimum temperature, maintaining the integrity of flavor and essence in each juice. Pailing is done in two conveyor lines, each with an electronic filler which measures the volume of each pail, ensuring consistency and accuracy of fill. The use of this dual line system allows us to package juice quickly, maintaining optimum temperature. Sanitation in the Juice Cellar, as in our other locals, is a top priority and is subject to our regular inspections.
Interesting point about the fires. Makes sense. good luck to them, farming is tough enough without one's hillside burning! On the upside.. Maybe it will add some smokey flavors? Maybe very interesting.....
 

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