Quantcast

Raspberry cello

Wine Making Talk

Help Support Wine Making Talk:

Tom

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2006
Messages
11,356
Reaction score
95
This can be done with almost any fruit/season

To make Raspberry Cello
Fill mason jar full of Raspberry loosly
Fill jar with Ever Clear
Wait 4-6 weeks
In a 275 ml bottle add 1/2 - 2/3 full of mix (strained in a french press) and then start adding simple syrup to taste (2 part sugar to 1 part water)


__________________
 

WaWa

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 31, 2009
Messages
136
Reaction score
0
Hi Tom
excuse my ignorance but what's cello and what's Ever Clear?
Thanks
 

St Allie

Tech Administrator
Joined
Mar 6, 2009
Messages
2,879
Reaction score
14
Wawa,

lemon cello and various flavours are a type of very high proof liqueur, the recipes call for 'everclear' which is a high proof grain alcohol similar to vodka .. roughly 120 proof I believe (60% alcohol) with a neutral flavour.

Allie
 

arcticsid

Arctic Contributor
Joined
Oct 26, 2008
Messages
4,203
Reaction score
57
Flammable Raspberry Liqueur Not in The Cards

I am not personally interested in making a Raspberry Flavoured Vodka. I have cooked professionally for almost 20 yrs. Even before becoming a wine making apprentice, I could figure that out. I want some "kick". But I also want it a little "thick", mouth feel if you will. I was thinking like40-60 percent, without discounting the fine spirit, and sure enough, not discounting the essence of the fruit involved, they all sound like raspberry flavoured av-gas.. I would rather add way more fruit, (in this case raspberries), than to water it down with the addition of any excess water outside of that introduced by the simple syrup. Since I first posted this request, I have looked at at least 20 different recipes and all sound like they make raspberry flavored vodka. After the addition of the simple syrup and water would these turn out a little less flammable? The additionof glycerin we will save for further along in this discussion. I want to make something nice to share with those who appreciate a nice cordial, not something to start their:):) beards on fire. (Yeah, some of the gals here have beards and smaoke stogies) LMFAO now!!:)
:d
Troy
 

Tom

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2006
Messages
11,356
Reaction score
95
Wawa,

lemon cello and various flavours are a type of very high proof liqueur, the recipes call for 'everclear' which is a high proof grain alcohol similar to vodka .. roughly 120 proof I believe (60% alcohol) with a neutral flavour.

Allie
Right your Allie
Except my Everclear is 190 Proof = 95% alcohol
 

Tom

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2006
Messages
11,356
Reaction score
95
I am not personally interested in making a Raspberry Flavoured Vodka. I have cooked professionally for almost 20 yrs. Even before becoming a wine making apprentice, I could figure that out. I want some "kick". But I also want it a little "thick", mouth feel if you will. I was thinking like40-60 percent, without discounting the fine spirit, and sure enough, not discounting the essence of the fruit involved, they all sound like raspberry flavoured av-gas.. I would rather add way more fruit, (in this case raspberries), than to water it down with the addition of any excess water outside of that introduced by the simple syrup. Since I first posted this request, I have looked at at least 20 different recipes and all sound like they make raspberry flavored vodka. After the addition of the simple syrup and water would these turn out a little less flammable? The additionof glycerin we will save for further along in this discussion. I want to make something nice to share with those who appreciate a nice cordial, not something to start their:):) beards on fire. (Yeah, some of the gals here have beards and smaoke stogies) LMFAO now!!:)
:d
Troy
Troy,
My cellos are "thick" @ a 2-1 simple syrup you already have thickness (moouthfeel) It is served COLD which again will thicken it. Thing of Peppermint Schnaps from a freezer.
All I can say is "try it" you may or may not like it.
You will never know if you don't
"Think out of the BOX"
 

arcticsid

Arctic Contributor
Joined
Oct 26, 2008
Messages
4,203
Reaction score
57
I'm trying to think "in the bottle":D

I will indeed try it Tom, looking forward to it. Will report back when I get er going. Thanks for the tips. Was that you that mentioned a walnut cello? That sounds interesting.

Troy
 

Tom

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2006
Messages
11,356
Reaction score
95
No, I did not mention walnut
Butt, I do make
Lemon
Lime
Orange
Blueberry
Cinnamon
Vanilla
 

arcticsid

Arctic Contributor
Joined
Oct 26, 2008
Messages
4,203
Reaction score
57
If you use the high octane everclear what do you think the final proof is? If I were to use 80 proof or even 100 proof liquor what would I end up with? While were on the subject, if I was to want a little tang to it would you use lemon juice, zest?
Thanks
 

Tom

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2006
Messages
11,356
Reaction score
95
depends.. If you use 2/3 "mix" and 1/3 syrup + 30-35% using EverClear
Sure,, Add what floats your boat. Start with th basic 1st as a control.
 

arcticsid

Arctic Contributor
Joined
Oct 26, 2008
Messages
4,203
Reaction score
57
gonna start rowing here pretty quick. I absolutely will start with the basic and go from there.
 

Dr Sniffy

Junior
Joined
Sep 26, 2009
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Grain alcohol is the best to use. There are many recipes on line that have no clue what they are talking about; They wonder why their experiment freezes when they have added too much water or used vodka as a base. I have made various infusions and the end product is never finished. Age makes them better, over-time they are easier to consume. The amount of sugar you use to make your simple syrup will determine who likes your drink or not. The less sugar you use will produce a mixture of Octane, but let this sit for a long time and its kick will lighten up. The more sugar you use, the product is ready to drink right away because it is sweet, not everybody likes sweet. Sweet does not always mean an intense flavor. Question you have to ask yourself: Are you making it for yourself or for others to enjoy?

I make my liquers strong... Between 45-60%. So I have to let them mellow for awhile before serving them. Everyones has a taste tolerance, I aim for those who can handle taking regular 35-40% shots. The after-taste of an infusion is the best part; There is no chaser needed... I am the test Rat for all the drinks I make before giving out the finished product. I enjoy making liquers for other people to enjoy, but I can truly appreciate a good liquer with a great taste without compromising the buzz effect.
 

BettyJ

Senior Member
Joined
May 22, 2009
Messages
180
Reaction score
1
I started out making mango and plum infused liquor, but they have proven very difficult to clear/ filter. I later tried some flavored extracts (real, not artificial) and am pleased with the lemon and use glycerin to thicken. Others impart a cloudiness (the orange and anise), but still taste great. Also have used the liquor flavorings like peach schnapps which taste great, but some of these have a color.
 

BettyJ

Senior Member
Joined
May 22, 2009
Messages
180
Reaction score
1
Oh, and I only have access to white rum 80 proof (live in the caribbean), and truly cannot tell that it is rum (have done blind tastings with local bars). Who knew?

This may not be up to par for you, just thought I would share my mixology tricks :)
 

Dr Sniffy

Junior
Joined
Sep 26, 2009
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
It is hard to filter fruits that are not composed of a citrus skin. I made a pineapple and necterine infusion but too much juice and pulp made the liquer cloudy. It is near impossible to filter this with coffee filters. This batch slightly freezes due to the high levels of actual fruit juice. I made a mistake by squeezing the fruit to extract all the juices held within. :?

Rum is not a bad base for an infusion. Brandy or Cognac works well also, I tend to use these as an additive spirit to the initial grain based infusion.
 

Wade E

Premium
Joined
Jul 3, 2006
Messages
33,224
Reaction score
269
You wont be diluting the abv that much arctic, its like fortifying a wine in the manner that it really takes more then you think you dilute or add abv.
 

St Allie

Tech Administrator
Joined
Mar 6, 2009
Messages
2,879
Reaction score
14
I used strawberries for my first one.. .. I also added a vanilla bean and on my second batch.. lemon zest too.. which came out really well and cleared beautifully.

The cherry recipe involved pitting and then breaking the pits and leaving those in.. I used eating cherries ( was all I had) and this came out too earthy for my taste. I would abort the whole adding the bashed pits phase of that recipe and add vanilla bean and zest next time.. see if that tweaks it. That one is 9 months old now and I've put it back in the cellar, will try it at a year and a half and see if it's improved.. if not.. I'll blend it with something else.

Allie
 

BettyJ

Senior Member
Joined
May 22, 2009
Messages
180
Reaction score
1
Mixing

Would you guys consider this "mixology" then? I was working on being a vintner when I grow up, but may have to throw in mixology as well.. LOL
 

winemanden

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2009
Messages
252
Reaction score
160
Location
Banbury UK
What's in a name. It is perfectly possible to make Raspberrycello the opposite way to Toms method. Fill your jar with Raspberries layered with granulated sugar. Leave several weeks shaking the jar regularly. The sugar will gradually draw the juice from the fruit. When you think it's ready, add whatever base spirit takes your fancy, ie brandy, whisky, vodka, everclear, to taste. If it needs a bit more body, a spoonful of glycerine works wonders.

If anyone is interested, I have a recipe for Portuguese Licoro. This is a chocolate milk and whisky liqueur which looks nothing like you'd expect. If you love chocolate it's well worth trying. I won the liqueur cup in our local show a couple of years back with this recipe. :try

Regards to all, Winemanden.
 

Latest posts

Top