Quantcast

Pssssst. Hey bud, commmmere...

Wine Making Talk

Help Support Wine Making Talk:

JohnT

Moderator
Super Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2010
Messages
10,001
Reaction score
5,706
The latest "fell off the back of the truck" deal.

I picked up a 6 rib roast yesterday. The plan is to cut a 2 rib roast off the end (for the freezer) and to cook the remainder on Christmas eve.

IMG_20161217_133747_094.jpg
 

ibglowin

Moderator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Jul 7, 2009
Messages
22,463
Reaction score
15,598
Location
Northern Nuevo Mexico
Dang that is a crazy (fall out the back of the truck) price. Smith's (Kroger) not even close to that. We are going to do the Prime Rib this year. Supposed to have 8-9 people over so I will need to snag a big one. Can't decide if I should do it in the new convection oven or the Costco Pit Boss (BGE) If the weather is nice may go the smoker route.

Screen Shot 2016-12-19 at 7.26.06 AM.png

Screen Shot 2016-12-19 at 7.26.36 AM.png
 

Boatboy24

No longer a newbie, but still clueless.
Joined
Mar 18, 2012
Messages
14,400
Reaction score
12,191
Location
DC Suburbs
The latest "fell off the back of the truck" deal.

I picked up a 6 rib roast yesterday. The plan is to cut a 2 rib roast off the end (for the freezer) and to cook the remainder on Christmas eve.
How can they call it "Prime Rib Roast" when it isn't Prime beef? Wouldn't it just be "Rib Roast". Regardless, a crazy good price. I picked up a fresh duck on Saturday for $3.59/lb. Looking forward to getting that guy on the smoker. Gotta keep my eyes open for turkey breast and prime rib as well. 'Tis the season to score big on meat!
 

JohnT

Moderator
Super Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2010
Messages
10,001
Reaction score
5,706
How can they call it "Prime Rib Roast" when it isn't Prime beef? Wouldn't it just be "Rib Roast". Regardless, a crazy good price. I picked up a fresh duck on Saturday for $3.59/lb. Looking forward to getting that guy on the smoker. Gotta keep my eyes open for turkey breast and prime rib as well. 'Tis the season to score big on meat!
What make you think it is not prime?
 

wineforfun

Still Trying To Make The Perfect Wine and Now Tryi
Joined
Nov 5, 2012
Messages
2,707
Reaction score
896
Couple of things.

Dannnng, that is cheap, I just paid $8.99lb in Omaha. They usually run between $10 - $11lb.

Technically they aren't "prime rib roast", they are a "ribeye roast", as shown in the Kroger ad. They are then prepared in the prime rib fashion.
 

wineforfun

Still Trying To Make The Perfect Wine and Now Tryi
Joined
Nov 5, 2012
Messages
2,707
Reaction score
896
The ad has the USDA 'Choice' label on it.
Exactly. They are only saying it is the type of roast used for prime rib, not that it is prime. Obvioulsy their advertising worked to "insinuate" it was prime.

Regardless, it is a great price and will make a great meal.
 

JohnT

Moderator
Super Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2010
Messages
10,001
Reaction score
5,706
I do it a bit differently.

I let the roast age in the fridge for 1 week,

at least 6 hours prior to cooking it.

I then take the roast out of the fridge and marinade in wochestershire sauce at least 6 hours prior to cooking it. I let the meat come up to room temperature.

After the chill is off the meast, I apply salt, pepper, and onion powder and then I bake at 450 for 20 minutes (to develop a crust). I then lower oven to 325 and roast until internal temp of 125 is reached. I then cover in foil (tightly) cover with several towels and allow to rest for about an hour. This resting will continue to cook the meat to 135 and allow the juices to flow back into the meat.
 

TonyR

Junior Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2014
Messages
406
Reaction score
151
It doesn't sound bad, I do the garlic slivers woth salt and pepper only.
 

Boatboy24

No longer a newbie, but still clueless.
Joined
Mar 18, 2012
Messages
14,400
Reaction score
12,191
Location
DC Suburbs
I'm not a fan of the garlic flavor you get when inserting like that. I do a rub of S&P, garlic powder and onion powder (sometimes some fresh or dried parsley) for ~24 hours prior to cooking. I'll sometimes also do a paste of garlic, herbs, S&P, EVOO and Dijon. Sear to start. Then the preferred method is low & slow with a little oak or pecan (250-ish) to finish at 125-130. Rest 15-20 minutes. The lower cook temp allows for a more evenly cooked roast. IMHO, 135 is WAY to hot to finish prior to resting. You're going to gain another 5+ degrees while resting.
 

ibglowin

Moderator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Jul 7, 2009
Messages
22,463
Reaction score
15,598
Location
Northern Nuevo Mexico
I was wondering (mainly) about the Dijon use. Have never tried it, they say you really can't taste it but it helps to create a nice crust/bark plus it helps your other spices to stay stuck on your meat.
 

Boatboy24

No longer a newbie, but still clueless.
Joined
Mar 18, 2012
Messages
14,400
Reaction score
12,191
Location
DC Suburbs
I was wondering (mainly) about the Dijon use. Have never tried it, they say you really can't taste it but it helps to create a nice crust/bark plus it helps your other spices to stay stuck on your meat.
I often use some yellow mustard on pork butt. Gets a nice, thick layer of rub on there for a great bark. Don't taste the mustard at all.
 

Johny99

Junior Member
Joined
Sep 9, 2010
Messages
969
Reaction score
639
I do it a bit differently.

I let the roast age in the fridge for 1 week,

at least 6 hours prior to cooking it.

I then take the roast out of the fridge and marinade in wochestershire sauce at least 6 hours prior to cooking it. I let the meat come up to room temperature.

After the chill is off the meast, I apply salt, pepper, and onion powder and then I bake at 450 for 20 minutes (to develop a crust). I then lower oven to 325 and roast until internal temp of 125 is reached. I then cover in foil (tightly) cover with several towels and allow to rest for about an hour. This resting will continue to cook the meat to 135 and allow the juices to flow back into the meat.
I do about the same but add sugar to the rub. It builds a nice carmelization in the crust.
 

Amanda660

Haven't met a grape I didn't like!
Joined
Nov 26, 2014
Messages
177
Reaction score
176
Location
West Central, MO
When I see these prices (even the sale $) I am so glad I raise my own beef & pork. Not gonna lie I hate the chores some days but the end result is pretty sweet!
 

JohnT

Moderator
Super Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2010
Messages
10,001
Reaction score
5,706
When I see these prices (even the sale $) I am so glad I raise my own beef & pork. Not gonna lie I hate the chores some days but the end result is pretty sweet!

OK,

How much would it cost for you to send me a roast? (Not kidding)
 

roger80465

Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2011
Messages
779
Reaction score
284
I have not used this recipe but I did use the following one last year. It was the best rib roast I have ever eaten. I have never tried one of Chef John's recipes that wasn't outstanding.

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/221958/chef-johns-perfect-prime-rib/

This roast is truly PERFECT. Five stars after 586 reviews is pretty good reference.
 

JohnT

Moderator
Super Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2010
Messages
10,001
Reaction score
5,706
Roger, that sounds very interesting, but would not work for me.

I need the oven HOT to do my Yorkshire puddings..

BTW, for the PERFECT Yorkshire pudding, get pudding pans like this..



Notice the shape is like a trumpet. This directs the puddings to puff upwards.


Start by placing your pans into a screaming hot oven (450 minimum).

The basic recipe is ..

1 cup milk, 1 cup flour, 3 eqqs. You can scale this up as needed.

you need to heat the milk until hot, whisk milk into eggs. whisk in flour and add pepper and salt to taste. Place resulting batter into a easy pour pitcher.

once the pans are hot, give each cup a shot of pam, return pan to re-heat for 1 minute.

Now move quick, open oven, and pour batter into each cup to within 1/2 inch of the top. It help if you place a cookie sheet underneath the pan to catch any spillage (I like to put the pan on the top rack, and the sheet on the bottom rack). pour the batter as quick as you can and close the oven door. Keep the door closed for 35 to 45 minutes until the Yorkshires are golden brown.

YUM!
 
Last edited:

Floandgary

Bottle at a time
Joined
Dec 24, 2012
Messages
910
Reaction score
322
I do it a bit differently.

I let the roast age in the fridge for 1 week,

at least 6 hours prior to cooking it.

I then take the roast out of the fridge and marinade in wochestershire sauce at least 6 hours prior to cooking it. I let the meat come up to room temperature.

After the chill is off the meast, I apply salt, pepper, and onion powder and then I bake at 450 for 20 minutes (to develop a crust). I then lower oven to 325 and roast until internal temp of 125 is reached. I then cover in foil (tightly) cover with several towels and allow to rest for about an hour. This resting will continue to cook the meat to 135 and allow the juices to flow back into the meat.
,,,and in keeping with the important part of the menu and giving the tastebuds a real thrill, the "Vin du Jour" will be_______?????:snta
 

wineforfun

Still Trying To Make The Perfect Wine and Now Tryi
Joined
Nov 5, 2012
Messages
2,707
Reaction score
896
I have not used this recipe but I did use the following one last year. It was the best rib roast I have ever eaten. I have never tried one of Chef John's recipes that wasn't outstanding.

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/221958/chef-johns-perfect-prime-rib/

This roast is truly PERFECT. Five stars after 586 reviews is pretty good reference.
I have not tried that way but a couple people I work with have (high heat, then leave door shut after turning off heat). They say it works great.

I notice a lot of prime rib recipes call to cook it that way.
 
Top