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Kivanc

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I am making wine from blackberry tea. I guess I’ve started at 1.120 because the tea was hot while I was plunging the hydrometer into the tube. I made yeast starter with 15% tolerance yeast and poured it into the 2.37 gallons of must after 4 hours but the primary fermentation lasts for 4 days than the actual 5 days. Is it ok? Now the reading is at 1.060 and I can hear enough fizzling sounds in the primary...
 
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Chuck E

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Fermentation takes its own time. As long as the hydrometer shows progress, just let the yeast keep working. Depending on your conditions, it may take 2 weeks. Keep checking it every few days.
And don't worry!
 

Rice_Guy

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Wine is forgiving so if you want to go anaerobic/ under air lock at 1.060 it can be done.

Your numbers are high so I wouldn’t be surprised if it turns into a stuck fermentation.
 

Kivanc

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Hi,
Many thanks for the information provided.
I just racked my 10 liters must into 8 liters bottle and the rest into 5 liters bottle at 1.050. They are fermenting fine. 5 liters bottle holds 2 liters of must. I am worried about the second bottle; does the second bottle prevent the air contamination with the available sufficient carbon dioxide?
 
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Kivanc

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does the second bottle prevent the air contamination by releasing carbon dioxide during the fermentation?
 

Chuck E

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does the second bottle prevent the air contamination by releasing carbon dioxide during the fermentation?
At SG 1.050, it is still fermenting. So, that means all of your bottles will have carbon dioxide in them. Usually, during fermentation it is good to have some oxygen in the must for the yeast to use. You might want to stir it every day.
 

NoQuarter

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does the second bottle prevent the air contamination by releasing carbon dioxide during the fermentation?
After you get down to 1.020 or so that much head space in the 5 litre bottle could become a problem. Look for a 2 litre bottle now while you have a little time.
 

Scooter68

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Contrary to some comments -

A fermentation, even at 1.020 and below is still producing significant amounts of CO2 plus there will be plenty of 'off-gassing' gassing of CO2 still going on for several days or even weeks after the fermentation is over. As long as there is an airlock on the containers and a decent seal - you have a positive pressure system (The reason for the bubbles in the airlock) Oxygen is being pushed out as it is lighter than CO2 so your container is being kept filled with CO2
 

NoQuarter

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Contrary to some comments -

A fermentation, even at 1.020 and below is still producing significant amounts of CO2 plus there will be plenty of 'off-gassing' gassing of CO2 still going on for several days or even weeks after the fermentation is over. As long as there is an airlock on the containers and a decent seal - you have a positive pressure system (The reason for the bubbles in the airlock) Oxygen is being pushed out as it is lighter than CO2 so your container is being kept filled with CO2
That's great news! Glad I don't have to worry about head space any longer when it comes to my secondary fermentations.
Thanks.
 

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