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potassium metabisulfite and potassium sorbate

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wineview

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I’ve been told to ad metabisulphite to my bucket at about six to eight weeks. Is Potassium Sorbate necessary? What do the two chemicals specifically do?
 

dralarms

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Kmeta is a preservative. Sorbate keeps yeast from multiplying
 

Johnd

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I’ve been told to ad metabisulphite to my bucket at about six to eight weeks. Is Potassium Sorbate necessary? What do the two chemicals specifically do?
K-meta is your anti-microbial and anti-oxidant, helping keep your wine safe from organic invaders and oxidation. You can add to your wine after fermentations (alcoholic and malolactic if applicable) at the rate of 1/4 tsp per 6 gallons, and every 3 months after that until your wine is bottled.

K sorbate is birth control for yeast. It won’t stop an active yeast colony from converting sugar to alcohol, but it will stop a few cells from reproducing into a colony. It is typically used after AF, when the winemaker wants to sweeten the wine before bottling. It is not necessary for a dry wine that won’t be sweetened.
 

Regmata

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Odd that all my WE Eclipse kits come with the sorbate...lodi cab, zin/cab bourbon barrel, nebbiolo, sauvignon blanc...none of which call to be sweetened.
 

wineview

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K-meta is your anti-microbial and anti-oxidant, helping keep your wine safe from organic invaders and oxidation. You can add to your wine after fermentations (alcoholic and malolactic if applicable) at the rate of 1/4 tsp per 6 gallons, and every 3 months after that until your wine is bottled.

K sorbate is birth control for yeast. It won’t stop an active yeast colony from converting sugar to alcohol, but it will stop a few cells from reproducing into a colony. It is typically used after AF, when the winemaker wants to sweeten the wine before bottling. It is not necessary for a dry wine that won’t be sweetened.
I’m chucking as I read your last line. I have a Chianti that is stuck at 1.008. Although not true to style it tastes fine just a bit sweet
 

Johnd

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I’m chucking as I read your last line. I have a Chianti that is stuck at 1.008. Although not true to style it tastes fine just a bit sweet
I’ve seen several members getting stuck just above 1.000, unable to get the yeast to chomp up that last bit of sugar. Always think one sure way to get the yeast to kick back in is to bottle it, that would be just my luck!!! Glad yours tastes good, true to style or not, taste is what we really strive for anyway, seems like that puts you in a pretty good spot!!
 

CK55

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I’ve seen several members getting stuck just above 1.000, unable to get the yeast to chomp up that last bit of sugar. Always think one sure way to get the yeast to kick back in is to bottle it, that would be just my luck!!! Glad yours tastes good, true to style or not, taste is what we really strive for anyway, seems like that puts you in a pretty good spot!!
My last batch stopped 1.001. I gave up lol I assumed it just was done couldn't get it to get any more out and that's dry enough you won't taste any sugar. Yeast was RC-212 OG 1.087
 

wineview

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I’ve seen several members getting stuck just above 1.000, unable to get the yeast to chomp up that last bit of sugar. Always think one sure way to get the yeast to kick back in is to bottle it, that would be just my luck!!! Glad yours tastes good, true to style or not, taste is what we really strive for anyway, seems like that puts you in a pretty good spot!!
I just made a super starter in a gallon jug. Once the yeast was going I put in 3 cups of the stuck wine. Three hours later there was some activity on the top. I gave it a swirl and three hours later nothing. I’m resigned to having a sweet wine for this batch having been tinkering for weeks now. I’ll dump the starter in the bucket and leave it for a week. No matter what happens after next week, I’m racking. Are there any precautions I should take when I bottle because of the sugar still in the solution it am I over reacting.
 

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I just made a super starter in a gallon jug. Once the yeast was going I put in 3 cups of the stuck wine. Three hours later there was some activity on the top. I gave it a swirl and three hours later nothing. I’m resigned to having a sweet wine for this batch having been tinkering for weeks now. I’ll dump the starter in the bucket and leave it for a week. No matter what happens after next week, I’m racking. Are there any precautions I should take when I bottle because of the sugar still in the solution it am I over reacting.
We’re it me, I’d definitely use K sorbate, just to be sure......
 

GreginND

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Odd that all my WE Eclipse kits come with the sorbate...lodi cab, zin/cab bourbon barrel, nebbiolo, sauvignon blanc...none of which call to be sweetened.
It is not too surprising. The kit manufacturers are trying to provide a product with instructions and additives that will consistently work for all customers. They tend to overprescribe additives such as sorbate to make as stable a final wine as possible across a wide range of winemaker's experience. Some people making their kits may end up with residual sugar and things could become fizzy later. So, to err on the side of caution, their instructions have you add sorbate every time.
 

wineview

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It is not too surprising. The kit manufacturers are trying to provide a product with instructions and additives that will consistently work for all customers. They tend to overprescribe additives such as sorbate to make as stable a final wine as possible across a wide range of winemaker's experience. Some people making their kits may end up with residual sugar and things could become fizzy later. So, to err on the side of caution, their instructions have you add sorbate every time.
This was not a kit. I bought a pail of juice.
 

Johnd

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K Sorbate to save a sweet wine?
If you bottle a wine with residual sugar, you run the risk of fermentation renewing in the bottle. K sorbate will prevent this. If you have the ability to sterile filter before bottling, you can go that route instead...
 

wineview

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If you bottle a wine with residual sugar, you run the risk of fermentation renewing in the bottle. K sorbate will prevent this. If you have the ability to sterile filter before bottling, you can go that route instead...
I have tried in vain to restart this wine with no success. Do you think I still run the risk of it starting in the bottle? If I add metabisulphite, won’t that stop any additional fermentation?
 

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I have tried in vain to restart this wine with no success. Do you think I still run the risk of it starting in the bottle? If I add metabisulphite, won’t that stop any additional fermentation?
I do think there is still risk, though it would seem to be low given the efforts you’ve made to restart. Sulfite doesn’t stop fermentation from recurring, or we wouldn’t need to use K sorbate. It’s your wine, your call.
 

wineview

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I do think there is still risk, though it would seem to be low given the efforts you’ve made to restart. Sulfite doesn’t stop fermentation from recurring, or we wouldn’t need to use K sorbate. It’s your wine, your call.
I was under the impression that k meta does stop re-fermentation. Yet you are saying k Sorbate does. So which is it.
 

Johnd

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Can K Sorbate and K Meta be stirred into the bottling bucket just before bottling or does it need time in a carboy?

Thanks
Certainly a good practice to apply both at the same time, maybe give it a little carboy time just to make sure all is well, then bottle.
 

Scooter68

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Can K Sorbate and K Meta be stirred into the bottling bucket just before bottling or does it need time in a carboy?

Thanks
Expect the unexpected - Don't wait until the last day, hour, minute to add K-Meta and K-Sorbate. Additives of any kind may, on some occasions, cause precipitates to drop out, or there may be some off-gassing. Plan ahead or delay the bottling at least a day to a week after adding K-Meta and K-Sorbate. One of the biggest mistake you can make is rushing things. This isn't like adding sugar to your coffee or tea.
 

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