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Darrell Hawley

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Soooo, you have given up on us having a significant export trade?
Not al all, The US will always have a large export trade. But, products made in the US do have an advantage at this point with a better on-time delivery and with the shipping cost added on, it helps them stay in business. News said this morning that normal shipping cost of $6,000+ is now $30,000+. But in the end, we will all have to pay for the higher cost at the store.
 

jswordy

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Not al all, The US will always have a large export trade. But, products made in the US do have an advantage at this point with a better on-time delivery and with the shipping cost added on, it helps them stay in business. News said this morning that normal shipping cost of $6,000+ is now $30,000+. But in the end, we will all have to pay for the higher cost at the store.
Beginning in the mid-1970s, the US consumer was sold into a trap that cheaper was always better, replacing the former attitude that "you get what you pay for." All US policy, regardless of party in power, has been driven by that since, and production has become fungible globally. It goes to the cheapest place now. My Apple computer was made in China and shipped to me directly from Ireland, due to Irish corporate tax breaks.

As part of adopting this direction, we convinced ourselves it was in our interest to create a mercantile China. I shudder to think of the day when the US and China are at war (which is why I watch Taiwan so closely). They would quickly bring us to our economic knees. I'm sure we would get back up again, but it would be a long journey.

The inflation we see on overseas (and domestic) goods now is transitory but I think it does serve to strength domestic sourcing somewhat.
 

sour_grapes

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Not al all, The US will always have a large export trade. But, products made in the US do have an advantage at this point with a better on-time delivery and with the shipping cost added on, it helps them stay in business. News said this morning that normal shipping cost of $6,000+ is now $30,000+. But in the end, we will all have to pay for the higher cost at the store.
At the risk of "dissecting the frog," I did understand what you meant. But US cargo can indeed get caught on cargo ships; it just happens in transit to other countries.
 

winemanden

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Beginning in the mid-1970s, the US consumer was sold into a trap that cheaper was always better, replacing the former attitude that "you get what you pay for." All US policy, regardless of party in power, has been driven by that since, and production has become fungible globally. It goes to the cheapest place now. My Apple computer was made in China and shipped to me directly from Ireland, due to Irish corporate tax breaks.

As part of adopting this direction, we convinced ourselves it was in our interest to create a mercantile China. I shudder to think of the day when the US and China are at war (which is why I watch Taiwan so closely). They would quickly bring us to our economic knees. I'm sure we would get back up again, but it would be a long journey.

The inflation we see on overseas (and domestic) goods now is transitory but I think it does serve to strength domestic sourcing somewhat.
Same over here!
 

cmason1957

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Beginning in the mid-1970s, the US consumer was sold into a trap that cheaper was always better, replacing the former attitude that "you get what you pay for." All US policy, regardless of party in power, has been driven by that since, and production has become fungible globally. It goes to the cheapest place now. My Apple computer was made in China and shipped to me directly from Ireland, due to Irish corporate tax breaks.

As part of adopting this direction, we convinced ourselves it was in our interest to create a mercantile China. I shudder to think of the day when the US and China are at war (which is why I watch Taiwan so closely). They would quickly bring us to our economic knees. I'm sure we would get back up again, but it would be a long journey.

The inflation we see on overseas (and domestic) goods now is transitory but I think it does serve to strength domestic sourcing somewhat.
I don't worry so much about that, since if they bring us to our knees, they do the same thing to themselves.
 

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