Quantcast

Peach Wine 1st attempt

Wine Making Talk

Help Support Wine Making Talk:

wineaddict

Junior
Joined
Aug 21, 2010
Messages
21
Reaction score
0
Finally got brave and am making my first attempt at making 5 gallons of peach wine. Below is the recipe I am going to use and I welcome any advise as I truly am a beginner.
Now revised as of 9/7/2010 thanks to some helpful advise.
1) Wash thoroughly 30 lbs of fully-ripened peaches or nectarines. Quarter them and remove the stone, stem, leaves and any bruised flesh. Then freeze for at least 2 weeks in ziplock bags. Pre- freeze first on cookie sheet for several hours.
2) Mash and put into muslin bag, along with juices place into 5 gallon bucket.
3) Dissolve 5 crushed campden tablets into must, wait at least 24 hours.
4) Add 2 tsp pectic enzyme, 6 tsp yeast nutrient, 2 tsp dry tannin, approximately 6 tsp. of acid blend (enough to bring the level up to 0.55% to 0.65%, prefer 0.60%). Wait 24 hours.
5) Add 8 lbs of sugar that has been dissolved in 1 gallon of water, now at room temperature combine with your must. With water bring total must level to 5 gallons, gravity should be 1.085, if not add sugar and test again. Add 1 package of yeast EC-1118 on top, no need to stir it in. Place lid on loosely after completion each day.
6) Twice a day stir must for about 5 to 7 days until gravity reaches 1.020 or less, then squeeze pulp bag of remaining juices (removing bag) and transfer must to carboy adding water to get to the 5 gallon level. After placing an airlock stopper on the carboy allow to sit for several weeks, or until the yeast settles approximate 1" from the bottom.
7) Transfer the must back into the bucket making sure you leave the yeast sentiment behind. Stir the must vigorously to drive off excess carbon dioxide gas. After cleaning the carboy transfer must from the bucket back into the carboy. Top off the carboy to within two inches from the top with water (optional, may dilute fruit flavor). Stir in 2 1/2 tsp of potassium sorbate to stabilize it, 1/4 tsp of K-meta, and then add Super-Kleer, replace airlock.
8) Wait 1 month and transfer the must back into the bucket making sure you leave the yeast sentiment behind. Stir the must vigorously to drive off excess carbon dioxide gas. After cleaning the carboy transfer must from the bucket back into the carboy. Repeat this step several times for the next 2 to 3 months.
9) When the gravity is at 1.00 or below it is ready to bottle. I will be using a Buon Vino Mini Jet Filter to filter the wine during the transfer.
Again any advise is welcome!
 
Last edited:

winemaker_3352

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2010
Messages
5,432
Reaction score
50
If this is a 5 gallon batch - i would increase the pounds of fruit.

5-6 #'s per gallon of wine.

Starting SG at 1.085.

Acid is on the high side of the fruit range - .55 - .65. I try to to split and go .60.
 

wineaddict

Junior
Joined
Aug 21, 2010
Messages
21
Reaction score
0
Thank you Winemaker_3352, I plan to make an additional 5 gallons, but using nectarines as soon as this is finished. I will take your advise and make it with 25+ lbs of fruit. What do you think about the amount of sugar (8 lbs)? More? Also do you think I am adding too much water near the end, will it dilute it? Thanks again
 

winemaker_3352

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2010
Messages
5,432
Reaction score
50
no problem.

i would make your must for 6 gallons - that way you can top up with the extra left over.

I put my extra in a cleaned out milk jug or empty carboy with an airlock on.

I would add like 3-4 pints of water per gallon.
 

Tom

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2006
Messages
11,356
Reaction score
95
Like said 5-6# MIN per gallon.
at 15# I would only add 3 gal of water
remember do not add any sugar of chemicals unless you tested the must. Sugar to 1.085 TOPS
Ck TA then add acid blend
Add 2 tsp pectin not one
Your tannin is high for 3 gal
When racking DO NOT ADD the water of U will get NO peach flavored wine
I would rethink the recipe

Using the Boun Vino Filter is only used to filter the wine prior to bottling. Do not filter when racking during aging. Use only to filter to a bottling bucket
 
Last edited:

wineaddict

Junior
Joined
Aug 21, 2010
Messages
21
Reaction score
0
I just added my sugar and yeast yesterday, would it be too late to add another teaspoon of pectin? Due to both of your advise it appears due to the amount of fruit that I initially put in (only 15 #'s), that I shouldn't add any more water to this recipe. I'm sure when I remove my strainer bag and remove the yeast sentiment that the must would then be about the 4 gallon or less amount? Thank you again for your advise.
 

wineaddict

Junior
Joined
Aug 21, 2010
Messages
21
Reaction score
0
Just measured my TA and it's at .60 and my SG is at 1.095, which I guess is a high sugar content? I guess it will take longer to go down and my alcohol content will be stronger?
 

Tom

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2006
Messages
11,356
Reaction score
95
You can add maybe a qt of water to lessen the alcohol.
Pectis does most of the work before you add the yeast. So. leave it alone for now.
Remove the pulp @ 1.020 then put under airlock.
Leave the lid loosly during primary.
 

wineaddict

Junior
Joined
Aug 21, 2010
Messages
21
Reaction score
0
Well it's day 4 since I have added my sugar and the hydrometer reading was 1.030. I like it when it seems like things are going to plan. It may be tomorrow where I can squeeze the pulp and do my first transfer. I have already processed 30 lbs of nectarines and I'll be getting ready for that soon. It's too bad I live in California and we have no basements, today it got up to 107 degrees, good thing for air conditioning.
 

wineaddict

Junior
Joined
Aug 21, 2010
Messages
21
Reaction score
0
Tom & Jon I have another question please.Yesterday I just added my chemicals to my nectarine batch as stated in step four of my 5 gallon recipe which includes 6 tsp of acid blend. When doing a acid test afterwards I am not getting a color change like I got on my peach batch. Could it possibly need more acid blend??? Keep in mind I haven't added my sugar or yeast yet
 

Tom

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2006
Messages
11,356
Reaction score
95
Tom & Jon I have another question please.Yesterday I just added my chemicals to my nectarine batch as stated in step four of my 5 gallon recipe which includes 6 tsp of acid blend. When doing a acid test afterwards I am not getting a color change like I got on my peach batch. Could it possibly need more acid blend??? Keep in mind I haven't added my sugar or yeast yet
Could mean a few things.
1 did you add the 3 drops in
2 Sodium Hydroxide is old
3 acid is to high.
 

winemaker_3352

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2010
Messages
5,432
Reaction score
50
Could mean a few things.
1 did you add the 3 drops in
2 Sodium Hydroxide is old
3 acid is to high.
Yeah - i agree - i have had that happen where the acid was through the roof. But like Tom said - check to make sure you added the 3-4 drops in and how old the sodium hydroxide is.
 

wineaddict

Junior
Joined
Aug 21, 2010
Messages
21
Reaction score
0
Well the acid kit is brand new, and yes I added the 4 drops. Could it possibly be the acid level is too low?
 

winemaker_3352

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2010
Messages
5,432
Reaction score
50
Well the acid kit is brand new, and yes I added the 4 drops. Could it possibly be the acid level is too low?
The other way around - when adding the sodium hydroxide in and you are not getting a color change - the acid level is too high.

3 cc's of the solution is .75 TA - so if you used all 3 cc's of it and no color change - your acidity is too high.
 

wineaddict

Junior
Joined
Aug 21, 2010
Messages
21
Reaction score
0
ok, that makes sense. I guess I'll add my 8 pounds of sugar (diluted in water) and test again, I'm guessing that should bring the acid level down.
 

winemaker_3352

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2010
Messages
5,432
Reaction score
50
ok, that makes sense. I guess I'll add my 8 pounds of sugar (diluted in water) and test again, I'm guessing that should bring the acid level down.
Yeah - anytime adding water in the must it will dilute the acidity - just don't water it down.

The dominate acid in peach is Malic - so you could use the Lalvin 71b 1122 Yeast which will also metabolize the malic acid - lowering the acid level.
 

wineaddict

Junior
Joined
Aug 21, 2010
Messages
21
Reaction score
0
Added 8 pounds of sugar in a room temperature gallon of water, then mixed in with my must. Then added water bringing the level up to 5 1/2 gallons. With this I got an acid reading of .55 so I added 2 teaspoons of acid blend (for a total of 8 tsp) to my 5 gallon batch and I think I am getting a reading of .57 I also took a sg reading and got a 1.11 Any suggestions on what to do to bring the levels back within range. I think the acid is on the low side especially after adding 8 tsp. Of course my sg is high, but what do I do. Thanks in advance for any help.
 

winemaker_3352

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2010
Messages
5,432
Reaction score
50
Acid is about right - i get mine to about .60 so .57 isn't bad - i would leave that alone.

As far as the SG - you might add water in to lower it - but that will also lower the acid level again.
 

wineaddict

Junior
Joined
Aug 21, 2010
Messages
21
Reaction score
0
That's what I was thinking, It's kinda like a catch 22. I was thinking of adding the water level and putting in one more tsp of acid blend, but that would make it a total of 9 tsp of acid blend that I would of put in. I'm thinking of just leaving it as is and seeing what happens, I'm sure it will taste terrible, LOL
 

winemaker_3352

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2010
Messages
5,432
Reaction score
50
Nah - it will be fine lower the SG and later up the acid if needs be.
 

Latest posts

Top