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Pasteurizing in bulk

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GreenEnvy22

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I have never pasteurized wine before, but this one very sweet wine that we make for a relative I am worried that it will referment on me even if I am using sorbate.
I was wondering about people's thoughts on pasteurization. It will be way too many bottles for me to try to do it in bottle. But after I back sweeten it, I was thinking of pasteurizing it in 8 gallon batches, then bottle as soon as it cools. I have a beer kettle that has a built-in temperature gauge which should work well. I do know some wineries pasteurize wine (and lots of beer is), so it must not affect the flavour too much. Anyone with any experience with this?
 

jgmillr1

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It is not recommended. I believe that breweries flash pasteurize the beer after bottling. Haven't heard of this being done in wineries though. Wineries sterile filter wine into the bottling equipment.

You will most certainly negatively affect the flavor of your wine if you hear it in a kettle. If you just use the correct amount of sorbate and Sulfites prior to your bottling, you should be in good shape.
 

JayDLaw

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I was wondering about the same thing. I read that it could be done, but as jg mentioned, it could effect (not absolute) taste from what I read. I would like to hear someone who tried it though. I to have an electric brew kettle, and was thinking about doing it also. The temperature used is around 140f, which is below boil point.
 

Rice_Guy

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Flash: 80C 15 seconds
. . . . . 70C 3 minutes
home: 60C 20 minutes
. . . . . 50C Try a hour,, would need to look up kill rates
You are killing yeast at the upper temp limit in the specification, ie I probably could also do a hot car in a parking lot for a day. or the back yard shed in Texas.
Expect that the effect is similar to having a year of age on your wine, acids last, fruity aroma suffers.
 
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JayDLaw

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It wouldn't be for a significant amount of time, and it would be prior to bottling. no oxidation issue, heat won't stay trapped. i do not see what's confusing, i'm exploring ways to successfully kill off yeast so i can sweeten if necessary. this is a potential way. by no means, am i married to any way, i am exploring, and i wanted to hear from someone who actually performed this, for verification of the issue. thanks for the link though.
 

Johnd

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It wouldn't be for a significant amount of time, and it would be prior to bottling. no oxidation issue, heat won't stay trapped. i do not see what's confusing, i'm exploring ways to successfully kill off yeast so i can sweeten if necessary. this is a potential way. by no means, am i married to any way, i am exploring, and i wanted to hear from someone who actually performed this, for verification of the issue. thanks for the link though.
The confusing part is that we already know that wine temps in the 80's F and above are detrimental to wine and consideration is being given to heating the wine to 140 F+, when there are at least a couple of ways to achieve the goal. The first is to use sorbate, which is done on a regular basis with huge success and requires an investment of only a couple of dollars. The second, is to use sterile filtration, which can be a bit more costly depending upon how you go about it, but it is also very successful.

I understand that you are just considering options, there's certainly nothing wrong with that, and certainly, if you want to try it, give it a go after you've considered all of the information that's available.
 

Rice_Guy

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Third method, * TIME, a year of age will starve off yeast at room temperature. 9 months usually is enough (yup have pasturized when it failed) and 6 months is too short.
there are at least a couple of ways to achieve the goal. The first is to use sorbate, . . . . The second, is to use sterile filtration,
 

JayDLaw

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I will most likely use sorbate, just wanted to to see if anyone has actually tried heating. i know its used to kill yeast in ciders after carbonation has been achieved.
 

chaylgd

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Have made sweet wines using sorbate and Kmeta without issues. I always let any wine after backsweetening sit for a week before bottling.
 

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