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Our sparkling mango is delicious!

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Noontime

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We popped open our fist sparkling mango wine over the weekend, and it was delicious. We decided not to do the traditional method and just throw yeast and sugar in there (figuratively) and cap it. So it was dry, but wonderfully effervescent and fruity. We'll definitely be doing that with future wines as we work up the courage to disgorge and make a sweeter one.

sparkling.jpg
 
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bakervinyard

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looks great. What recipe did you use ? how old is it ? Bakervinyard
 

damudman

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I am about to start a mango in two days. It is allot of work getting mango's pealed and seed out.
I froze mine for a week after I clean them.
 

Noontime

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Mango is such a beautiful flavor, and just a potential tip...I think I need to add more acid in future batches to try and get some crispness.

I don't have my notes, so I'll have to get back about the recipe (which is really just how much mango to water ratio). I'll have to try the freezing next time. We've found (so far) the easiest is to cut them in hlaf and just use a spoon to scooop and scrape all the fruit.

We bulk aged about 8 months, trying to get it to clear a little more (the still wine). We've found the mango can drop a lot of sediment later on in the bottle, so we'll see how that turns out.

We only made 4 bottles of sparkling which we had sequestered from the rest of the stabilized wine. We decided not to do the traditional method of disgorging and just threw yeast and sugar in there (figuratively). We just let the yeast do their thing, and will be careful of the sediment at the bottom of the bottle. It really wasn't difficult at all doing it that way. The traditional method is definitely intimidating though.

So it was dry, but wonderfully effervescent and fruity. Marvelous mango flavor with the bubbles bringing that wonderful peachy mango aroma right to the nose. We'll definitely be making more with future wines, as we work up the courage to disgorge and make a sweeter one.
 

Noontime

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Here's a link to my wife's blog http://www.winescribbles.com/2013/04/mango-wine-update-bottling-the-wine/ that mentions the bottling of the sparkling mango.

We used 43 lbs of peeled and pitted mangos (just the meat) that we had frozen, to make about 6 gallons. We added 3.5 tsp of powdered pectic enzyme while it thawed, and added water to 6.5 gallons.

At 62 deg we added 4 pureed bananas and premier cuvee. All of the fruit was in a mash bag by the way...learned that after the first time! SG was 1.040, so we added 15 cups of cane sugar to bring it up to 1.100.

We transferred to secondary container at SG .992, and split it to a 5 gallon carboy and a 1 gallon bottle. The 5 gal. we topped off with moscato and added sorbate and kmeta.

At 3 months we racked and tried to clear with chitosan but that did nothing, so we used sparkaloid and that cleared it in about 4 days. We split it up again into 3 gal, and 2 separate 1 liter containers. We sweetened the 3 gal with sugar, 1 liter with honey, and the other with frozen grape concentrate.

5 months later we bottled. Unfortunately the concentrate bottle had pooped it's bung at some point and that one spoiled...I dumped my first wine down the drain.:(

The sparkling I made a starter of EC-1118 and added 1.5 tsp cane sugar to each champagne bottle. Inoculated, put the plastic stopper in, and wire caged it. We put them in the spare bathroom bathtub just in case there were any bottle bombs, but I was more worried it wouldn't ferment at all. But they did and it was very good.
 

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