Onion and a garlic wine for cooking

Discussion in 'Special Interest Wines' started by pgentile, Feb 11, 2018.

Wine Making Forum

Help Support Winemaking Talk by donating:

  1. Feb 11, 2018 #1

    pgentile

    pgentile

    pgentile

    Still learning

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2015
    Messages:
    1,042
    Likes Received:
    818
    Gender:
    Male
    Decided to push the envelope on my wine making boundaries this weekend. Did a bit of googling and came up with a few recipes for onion and garlic wines. Considered a beet wine, but decided that will be next winters boredom project

    These wines will be for cooking and marinating, but I've read a few who feel that the vidalia onion wine is actually a decent drinker after a year better at 2.

    3.5 gl Onion Wine:

    3 # Vidalia onions
    3 # potatoes
    3 # raisins
    6 lemons/zest/juice
    6 # sugar
    acid blend
    pectic enzyme
    yeast nutrient

    Shredded potatoes and onions, boiled for 30-40 minutes, strained, added other ingredients.

    2.5 gl Garlic Wine:

    1.5 # garlic
    1 # raisin
    2 lemon/zest/juice
    4 # sugar
    acid blend
    pectic enzyme
    yeast nutrient

    Roasted garlic in foil until caramelized, then boiled for 20 min, strained added other ingredients.

    Waiting for them to cool down further and then going to use excess packets of yeast ec-1118 and 71b-1122.

    Onion wine ended up at 1.082 and the garlic 1.078.

    DSC_3386.jpg DSC_3390.jpg DSC_3391.jpg DSC_3395.jpg DSC_3398.jpg DSC_3410.jpg DSC_3412.jpg DSC_3417.jpg DSC_3419.jpg DSC_3422.jpg
     
  2. Feb 12, 2018 #2

    sour_grapes

    sour_grapes

    sour_grapes

    Victim of the Invasion of the Avatar Snatchers

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2013
    Messages:
    8,807
    Likes Received:
    6,138
    I bet the house smelled amazing.
     
    pgentile likes this.
  3. Feb 12, 2018 #3

    pgentile

    pgentile

    pgentile

    Still learning

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2015
    Messages:
    1,042
    Likes Received:
    818
    Gender:
    Male
    It still does. Also as far as pre-fermentation taste goes, the onion wine tastes like a bland sweet oniony potato soup and the garlic wine tastes like a sweet punch in the mouth of garlic.
     
    sour_grapes likes this.
  4. Feb 12, 2018 #4

    Jericurl

    Jericurl

    Jericurl

    The Ferminator

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2013
    Messages:
    1,297
    Likes Received:
    772
    Brace yourself. It's probably going to stink to high heaven, but the end product is well worth it.
     
    mikewatkins727 and pgentile like this.
  5. Feb 12, 2018 #5

    pgentile

    pgentile

    pgentile

    Still learning

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2015
    Messages:
    1,042
    Likes Received:
    818
    Gender:
    Male
    I will be prepared
     
  6. Feb 12, 2018 #6

    pgentile

    pgentile

    pgentile

    Still learning

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2015
    Messages:
    1,042
    Likes Received:
    818
    Gender:
    Male
    A few more photos:
    DSC_3397.jpg DSC_3399.jpg DSC_3400.jpg DSC_3402.jpg DSC_3406.jpg
     
  7. Feb 12, 2018 #7

    balatonwine

    balatonwine

    balatonwine

    The Verecund Vigneron

    Joined:
    May 9, 2017
    Messages:
    893
    Likes Received:
    603
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Badacsony wine region. Hungary
    To each their own. Not judging. Live and let live.

    But, personally, making garlic and onion essential oils is easier. And maybe better for cooking.

    And, IMHO, eating the whole plant is always better than just its "essences" .
     
  8. Feb 12, 2018 #8

    pgentile

    pgentile

    pgentile

    Still learning

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2015
    Messages:
    1,042
    Likes Received:
    818
    Gender:
    Male
    I don't see where anyone is arguing against that. I don't disagree. That's common sense to me.

    Just want to have some fun with wine making, sorry if it offends you.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2018
    Redbird1 and Johnd like this.
  9. Feb 12, 2018 #9

    Arne

    Arne

    Arne

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2010
    Messages:
    4,796
    Likes Received:
    871
    Keep track of the equiptment you use. Could be hard to get the oders out and you do not want to have the next batch tasting like onions or garlic. Or maybe you do. Good luck with it, Arne.
     
    pgentile and Redbird1 like this.
  10. Feb 13, 2018 #10

    balatonwine

    balatonwine

    balatonwine

    The Verecund Vigneron

    Joined:
    May 9, 2017
    Messages:
    893
    Likes Received:
    603
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Badacsony wine region. Hungary
    Sighs..... It didn't "offend" me. What an odd comment. Especially after I took explicit pains to express the complete opposite in my first sentence.

    Just expressing my opinion. I hoped I could do that here. Maybe I was wrong.....

    But thanks for adding it is for fun. Having fun is good.
     
  11. Feb 13, 2018 #11

    pgentile

    pgentile

    pgentile

    Still learning

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2015
    Messages:
    1,042
    Likes Received:
    818
    Gender:
    Male
    No worries everything was annoying me that day and I didn't have time to respond to what I should have in your reply.

    I've made infused oils and stuff from everything in the garden over the years, bored with it. Also oils and wines are used differently in cooking. I don't deglaze with oil and make gravy.

    Couldn't the same thing be said for grapes? Onions and potatoes were boiled then strained and squeezed. The garlic was caramelized, boiled, strained and squeezed. The garlic before being boiled was crazy sticker from the sugars in it. There are a large amounts of particles from the ingredients in the wine and will form a lees. So I think both are a little more than essence, in fact they went through a similar process to being crushed. Now sugar was added to the wines, but that happens with most non grape wines and even sometimes to grape wines.

    IMHO
     
  12. Feb 24, 2018 #12

    pgentile

    pgentile

    pgentile

    Still learning

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2015
    Messages:
    1,042
    Likes Received:
    818
    Gender:
    Male
    Racked the vidalia onion and the garlic wine today. Lees were the stinkiest to date. Cleaned the carboys, zero odor left behind.
    IMG_20180224_121915322_1.jpg
     
  13. Dec 29, 2018 #13

    G259

    G259

    G259

    Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2018
    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    18
    I'll ask a question out of curiosity: Why potatoes, is there a reason for them to be in the recipe? Is it a starch thing, and will yeast feed on that, as well as the sugar?
     
  14. Dec 30, 2018 #14

    bobpf

    bobpf

    bobpf

    Junior

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    10
    Very cool. Really interested in the results. Potatoes would not add any sugars unless you mashed them with a alpha amylase source (barley, alpha amylase powder, etc...), but might bring some body to the wine I would think. Keep up the posts and your thoughts about the process! Thanks.
     
  15. Dec 31, 2018 #15

    pgentile

    pgentile

    pgentile

    Still learning

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2015
    Messages:
    1,042
    Likes Received:
    818
    Gender:
    Male
    I followed recipes from Jack Keller and some others. I don't remember them explaining why they used them, but the recipes call for simmering potatoes and onions and then straining them discarding the pulp. I assume the potatoes are for mouthfeel and body. Starch might get converted to sugar in the process but not sure. Sugar is added to the recipe.

    I use the onion and garlic wines for cooking wines. Primarily de-glazing and such. Can't really tell is it adds anything different than grape wine for cooking, but all dishes have been good with it. Going to taste both when they hit one year. Onion is supposed to be drinkable. We shall see.
     
  16. Jan 1, 2019 #16

    BernardSmith

    BernardSmith

    BernardSmith

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2011
    Messages:
    2,741
    Likes Received:
    970
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Saratoga Springs
    Potato wine has a long and illustrious history country history. Don't know so much about the reputation of onion wine but I would be surprised if it was not pleasantly drinkable.
     
  17. Jan 1, 2019 #17

    pgentile

    pgentile

    pgentile

    Still learning

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2015
    Messages:
    1,042
    Likes Received:
    818
    Gender:
    Male
    So I have heard, same with beet wine, which is on my radar one of these years.
     
  18. Jan 1, 2019 #18

    BernardSmith

    BernardSmith

    BernardSmith

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2011
    Messages:
    2,741
    Likes Received:
    970
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Saratoga Springs
    I have Peggy Hutchinson's book - Home Made Wine Secrets which has no publication date but which I think was published in the 30's or 40's (although many of her recipes call for spreading the yeast on a slice of bread)- and she has two or three recipes for beet wine.
     
    pgentile likes this.

Share This Page