Oaking Question.

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Addsae36

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I know that white oak in particular American white and French white are the standard for oaking. I have searched the web and here and have not found an answer for my question, and my question is given that post oak is a white oak does any one have any experience oaking with it? I have several logs drying right now that my friend who clears trees from lots gave me and I got them with the intention of drying them toasting them and adding them to a batch.

So again long story short is post oak a viable option for oaking?
 
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When researching woods, look for the species name -- searching for "post oak winemaking" produced nothing of relevance. Searching on the post oak species (quercus stellata) produced useful results.

Post oak (quercus stellata) is not white oak (Quercus alba), they are different species. However, I found several references that call stellata a "secondary oak", which appears to mean that alba is normally used, but stellata is as well. Search this page for "stellata" to see the synopsis of a book that states this.


The following page also lists stellata as a secondary species to alba, for use in barrel making.


It appears stellata is useful for winemaking. However, I'd test on a small batch or 2 to ensure the flavor produced is to your liking.

Also note that oak for winemaking is typically aged 1.5 to 3 years -- it needs to dry out completely. I'd put the wood away in a dry location, and in about a year cut 1/2" to 3/4" cubes from it, and toast the cubes.

Please report back on your experiences with this.
 

Addsae36

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I’ll have to look it up under that name, I did cube a log and notch the blocks for more surface area. Then I dried them out in my oven at 220° for roughly 10 hours or so. The wood is noticeably smaller, a little warped, hard sounding when banged together, and the green smell is gone. I just charred a a cube and stuck in some vodka to see how well it leeches. If I’m honest as honest I can get I think my friend had this batch stacked for about 2-3 months prior to me picking it.
 
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From what I've read, natural aging of the wood makes a difference. An interesting experiment would be to process wood every 3 months, and add it to a 1 gallon batch, to see how as the wood ages, it changes its effect upon the wine.
 
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