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New member here

I joined a Facebook group and they all recommended Dave's dragon blood asa first and quick attempt to home wine making. I don't have a lot of prep room. I also have no tools what so ever.
I'm starting from scratch literally- anyone can point me into a right direction? There's just so many forums and info- it's so easy to get lost.

thanks so much
 

Scooter68

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I would suggest a starter kit (Without Juice) to get the basic tools.
MUST HAVE Hydrometer - Probably the most important tool.
Also if you are serious get a digital pH meter. Using litmus paper is way to difficult. (We want you to succeed not struggle to get started.)
A number of other items but if you start with a wine making kit it should have most everything you need in terms of basic additives.

Here's the one I started with and although it states "Fruit Wine making kit" it's the same thing.

No kit is going to have everything you need. (Like a pH meter) but a kit like this should have the basics.
Don't worry about bottling supplies for now. You have at least a couple of months before you'll be ready for that, AND you will want to decide how deep you are going to get into this and what size batches you want to make. (Most commons beginning batch sizes are 1, 3, and 5 gallon)

By the time you get done buying the basics you should be able to get everything but the fruit/juice for around $200 - $300
You might get started for less than that but that's a modest amount once you have it all in hand.
Also for bottles you can buy new bottles or find them at a recycling center (OR make friends at a restaurant that serves a lot of wine)

BEWARE of the old stories of balloons on a bottle/carboy for an airlock or other tips that sound too easy.

Welcome to the hobby of wine making and remember, there are a variety of ways to make good wine but the thing you need most of all is PATIENCE.
 

sour_grapes

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I agree with Scooter.

Where are you located? There might be a "local homebrew store" (LHBS) near you, so you can see/buy some of this in person. (Of course, they may be closed where you are!)

Scooter mentioned batch size. Let me note that, if you are interested in doing wine kits in the future, you should know that they are almost all 6 US gallons (23L). Thus, getting a 6-gallon carboy might be a good idea if you see yourself going that way in the future. That also requires a 7.9 gallon (30L) bucket.

I agree not to worry about bottling supplies right now. But, when that time comes, I recommend springing for a "floor corker" over the cheaper "hand corker." Many here have bought a hand corker, only to later buy a floor corker!
 
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I would suggest a starter kit (Without Juice) to get the basic tools.
MUST HAVE Hydrometer - Probably the most important tool.
Also if you are serious get a digital pH meter. Using litmus paper is way to difficult. (We want you to succeed not struggle to get started.)
A number of other items but if you start with a wine making kit it should have most everything you need in terms of basic additives.

Here's the one I started with and although it states "Fruit Wine making kit" it's the same thing.

No kit is going to have everything you need. (Like a pH meter) but a kit like this should have the basics.
Don't worry about bottling supplies for now. You have at least a couple of months before you'll be ready for that, AND you will want to decide how deep you are going to get into this and what size batches you want to make. (Most commons beginning batch sizes are 1, 3, and 5 gallon)

By the time you get done buying the basics you should be able to get everything but the fruit/juice for around $200 - $300
You might get started for less than that but that's a modest amount once you have it all in hand.
Also for bottles you can buy new bottles or find them at a recycling center (OR make friends at a restaurant that serves a lot of wine)

BEWARE of the old stories of balloons on a bottle/carboy for an airlock or other tips that sound too easy.

Welcome to the hobby of wine making and remember, there are a variety of ways to make good wine but the thing you need most of all is PATIENCE.
Thanks for so much info
 
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I agree with Scooter.

Where are you located? There might be a "local homebrew store" (LHBS) near you, so you can see/buy some of this in person. (Of course, they may be closed where you are!)

Scooter mentioned batch size. Let me note that, if you are interested in doing wine kits in the future, you should know that they are almost all 6 US gallons (23L). Thus, getting a 6-gallon carboy might be a good idea if you see yourself going that way in the future. That also requires a 7.9 gallon (30L) bucket.

I agree not to worry about bottling supplies right now. But, when that time comes, I recommend springing for a "floor corker" over the cheaper "hand corker." Many here have bought a hand corker, only to later buy a floor corker!
Hey: thanks for the info- I'm in New York City- things are a little crazy here... I can see myself getting 6 gallon holder etec. I definitely would love to make a hobby of it. Any other recommendations?
 

hounddawg

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, Johnd and sour_grapes said it right,,,,, there, NY it is nuts right now, so if you're going online any carboys get italian carboys,,, chinese are much thinner ,, labelpleelers.com is a good place to start for carboys and wine bottles, for concentrates and a few other things try,,, homewinery.com ,,,,and if you get addicted to making wine then look up vacuumpumpman on here, Steve's all in one vacuum pumps,, speed up up rackings, degassing and bottling, and gives great customer service,
best of luck to you,,,
Dawg
 

Scooter68

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RE: Hand Corkers - If you look on EBay you will find more hand-held corking tools than any other variety. Most are used, slightly used or never used - from folks who learned the hard way.
 

bkisel

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Welcome to the forum!

Where from in the City? I'm originally from NYC. As a baby (1944) E 7th between B and C, then Lillian Wald projects 3rd St. and Ave. D, Woodside projects Queens and a Woodside apartment before moving out of the city in 1976.
 
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Welcome to the forum!

Where from in the City? I'm originally from NYC. As a baby (1944) E 7th between B and C, then Lillian Wald projects 3rd St. and Ave. D, Woodside projects Queens and a Woodside apartment before moving out of the city in 1976.
Welll to be exact Brooklyn ny. I spent a lot of time where you grew up. It's a whole different world. To be honest I miss the old New York City. Of course the new buildings are nice and all- but it's lost it's soul. I loved the village and your area the most- the village has maintained its culture out of all areas.
 
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I agree with Scooter.

Where are you located? There might be a "local homebrew store" (LHBS) near you, so you can see/buy some of this in person. (Of course, they may be closed where you are!)

Scooter mentioned batch size. Let me note that, if you are interested in doing wine kits in the future, you should know that they are almost all 6 US gallons (23L). Thus, getting a 6-gallon carboy might be a good idea if you see yourself going that way in the future. That also requires a 7.9 gallon (30L) bucket.

I agree not to worry about bottling supplies right now. But, when that time comes, I recommend springing for a "floor corker" over the cheaper "hand corker." Many here have bought a hand corker, only to later buy a floor corker!
i found a local Vendor with your advice. He gets many different juices also. Only issue no one is operating right now. I may just order that amazon kit for now and screw around.... can anyone share a link on amazon for the proper electronic ph meter- there are so many. Thanks
 

Scooter68

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Now you did it. Opinions on pH meters swings widely in different directions.

For my two cents worth...
I've got two. The first lasted me about 3 + years and did fine I replaced it with one like this:

My first was about like this one:


Most important -regardless of what you spend, get some calibration powder/solution and check the calibration at least once every couple of weeks if you are using it frequently. ALL pH meters have to be calibrated periodically.
 

Rice_Guy

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As a first batch you could be creative with the hardware,
would love to make a hobby of it. Any other recommendations?
follow the recipe without worrying about the numbers, it gets you close enough to taste good.
Ex. hardware in the time of lock down,
1) primary fermentor= a clean plastic pail or stock pot or porcelain canner or crockery kombucha fermentor or even a large flower pot lined with plastic sheeting. When fermenting cover it with a towel or masonite board or another plastic sheet
2) anaerobic fermentor= a gallon jug(s) or two gallon water bottle or camping cubitainer water bottle or even plastic sheeting which is tied with rubber bands/closed off creating a small opening and then put back in the rigid container from #1
3) air lock= a piece of tubing tied inside rubber band with sheeting that is placed in a glass of water or a balloon over the mouth of the gallon jug or a silicon funnel stretched over the mouth of the camping water bottle with tubing again dropped,,,,, what else have I tried humm?
4) siphon tube
5) wine bottles or canning jars or keep it in a gallon in the fridge or quart water bottles

i sin and have collected toys like pH and pumps and vacuum. But! folks didn’t use these 2000 years ago. They mainly drank it young.
The “toys“ are important for wines that will have shelf life!
 

itsmeagain

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Hi y'all, has anyone made a fruit san gria, and corked it for later? I am "planning" on making some soaking the fruit for about 3/5 days, removing the fruit and the bottling it for later in the summer. Any idea's? Not to worried about the sg or ending gravity, just wondering. Thanks Dennis
 

sour_grapes

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I would be worried about transferring some sugar from the fruit, and then having that referment in the bottle. But this may be an overly fussy worry. You could find out by measuring the SG of your base wine, then soaking the fruit, then remeasuring the SG. If it goes up more than a coupla points, I wouldn't bottle it, myself.
 

Rice_Guy

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* I would expect that there is contamination on the skin. If I was eliminating contamination in the micro lab I would do a technique like spraying the skin with grain alcohol. (we also use 10% bleach) The risk is less if the added fruit is high solids/ there is less dilution of alcohol in the wine.
* you don’t need to sanitize if you keep the batch refrigerated. Longer as a month is better if you use whole fruit. You can reduce time by slicing the fruit.
* a third option is similar to making mint or vanilla extract, create your extract with 1:1 grain alcohol fruit, at room temp for a month. This flavored wine will be stable at room temp.
has anyone made a fruit san gria, and corked it for later? I am "planning" on making some soaking the fruit for about 3/5 days, removing the fruit and the bottling it for later in the summer. Any idea's?
 

sour_grapes

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I should have mentioned -- if you do get too many sugars transferred, you could add potassium sorbate to inhibit refermentation before bottling.
 

Scooter68

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Did the topic of this thread suddenly change?
 
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