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Make bread with WINE yeast? :D

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yaeyama

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I'm sure many people getting into home brewing have tried to make wine or beer using regular bread yeast. But I was just curious...what would the likely results be if you made bread using wine yeast? Would you end up with regular tasting bread? Or something completely different?

If I had to guess, I would say that you would, in fact, end up with bread that tastes pretty much the same as a loaf made with regular bread yeast would taste.

Anybody know? :)
 

Luc

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I am not sure that it would work.

Bread yeast is selected for a specific target: making CO2 gas.

Wine yeast is selected for making alcohol.
Wine yeast starts slower as bread yeast, in some cases starting fermentation
can take up to 2 days with bread you do not have that time span.
A bread must be rising in a few hours.

Even worse: a bread will rise in the oven at a higher temperature.
Wine yeast will die if temperature rises above 32 degrees celsius or there about.

I have never tried it (and I bake my own bread every week) but when in the near future I have a yeast starter available I will give it a try.

Luc
 

Trailguide

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Using Wine Lees

I wonder if using the fragrant, yeast-rich lees from the primary fermentation would make a good bread? I have retained and used lees to start up a new batch of wine. I have some lees from my most recent persimmon wine waiting in the fridge. I'm thinking that they would be great in raisin bread. Any thoughts, opinions, advice.......?
Thanks!
Cathy
 

jdymen

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I wonder if using the fragrant, yeast-rich lees from the primary fermentation would make a good bread? I have retained and used lees to start up a new batch of wine. I have some lees from my most recent persimmon wine waiting in the fridge. I'm thinking that they would be great in raisin bread. Any thoughts, opinions, advice.......?
Thanks!
Cathy
Kathy, i dont know much about Baking Bread, but i can tell you a couple of issues.

Lees at the end of fermentation usually dont contain much yeasts, the yeasts have died because of the level of alcohol and specially because of the lack of food (sugar).

Innoculations to products as bread you need a large ammount of yeast to produce a big ammount of CO2 in a short time, and the high temperature is to make the CO2 expand and make bigger bubbles. (fermentation like Champagne traditional method are made under low temperatures to make the bubbles smaller and more delicate)

When you try to preserve living organisms, you usually use dry ice to freeze faster the samples. Slow freeseng, makes the water cristals smaller and that helps braking the celular membrane of the yeasts. Obviously you are not going to kill all the yeasts but you will loose a large number.

My recomendation if you want wine yeasts to make bread is to add a little of wine in the middle of fermentation to rise the bread and see what happens, in that way you will have the largest ammount of yeasts you can have, and a particular taste of wine. The alcohol will evaporate in the oven.

Recommendation...use those lees to cook. add them to a steak while you bakeit or make a sauce adding a little of flour and butter.

cheers

Jose

;)
 

Kevinski324

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Re:Make Bread with wine yeast

My mom recently ran out of bread yeast, and she really wanted to make a loaf of her special bread(made in a bread making machine). So, when she found my white wine yeast(anchor vt208, I think), she decided to just pitch that in instead of bread yeast. The results were astounding! The white dough along with the wine yeast made an extremely sweet loaf of brown bread! It tasted fantastic! I don't really understand the whole process, and it baffels me that the bread did turn brown, but I am all for it, and I would encourage her, or anyone, to give it a try!
Kevin
 

yaeyama

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Kevinski324, thanks for your interesting post. I guess I'll give it a try next weekend when I bake some bread. Lord knows I have no other use for Red Star Montrachet after everybody here scared me off of it. :p

(I also have a sachet of Cotes des Blancs as well as Lalvin EC-1118. Any suggestions as to which of these 3 I should use? I would hate to wake up at 6:30am to start a 3.5 hour baking session only to find the bread was a write-off. ;) )
 

scubaman2151

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I have always heard that you shouldnt use bread yeast to make wine.

Scuba
 

yaeyama

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Kevinski324, thanks for your interesting post. I guess I'll give it a try next weekend when I bake some bread.
Well, as mentioned, I made bread this past weekend using wine yeast. I used a packet of Cotes des Blancs, and made the bread using a bread making machine. The loaf came out PERFECT -- absolutely perfect shape, colour, and texture -- except it was about 75% of the normal size. It also felt a bit more "smooshy", moister, than usual. I suspect that the wine yeast has a slower metabolism than regular bread yeast does, and if my machine had the capability of letting the loaf rise for a longer period of time, the results would have been not really different from real bread yeast. By the way, no discernable colour or taste difference.

Here are a couple of photos of Cotes des Blancs bread:




By the way, the chunks are dried fruits and nuts. :)

I think I'll try this exercise again in the near future with EC-1118 and see what happens. :)

200805171231000.jpg

200805171232000.jpg
 
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Luc

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I suspect that the wine yeast has a slower metabolism than regular bread yeast does, and if my machine had the capability of letting the loaf rise for a longer period of time, the results would have been not really different from real bread yeast.
Told you so :D

scubaman2151 said:
I have always heard that you shouldnt use bread yeast to make wine.
What nonsense, who told you so ???
Give it a try, you might be surprised :)

Luc
 
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