Lychee Wine Recipe?

Discussion in 'Country Fruit Winemaking' started by FlTropical, Jun 13, 2011.

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  1. Jun 13, 2011 #1

    FlTropical

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    After learning as much as I could from my father in law and reading a few books I am ready to make my first wine. I have access to the best fresh lychees in the world an would like to use them.

    I need a good recipe, hoping to create a very sweet wine. Not quite dessert sweet, but good and fruity.

    Any recipes for lychee wine, tips or sugestions greatly appreciated. I ready some articles saying I have to use tannin because lychees are not acidic. I am not sure I want to use tannin if it is going to take away from the sweetness.
     
  2. Jun 13, 2011 #2

    sly22guy

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  3. Jun 13, 2011 #3

    docanddeb

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    You might want to have extra juice frozen to sweeten and bring the flavor back up at the end as well.

    Jack Keller's Wine site has a recipe for almost anything. Start a "Favorites" on your computer and everytime someone mentions something... stash it there for future reference.

    Good Luck!!

    Debbie
     
  4. Jun 14, 2011 #4

    FlTropical

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    Thank you both so much. Do you mean sugar back it after the 2nd fermentation is complete?

    I Had picked up champagne yeast per my father in law, any drawback?

    Many thanks since this is my first batch.
     
  5. Jun 14, 2011 #5

    FlTropical

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    Ok one more Q. That recipe says 5 lbs of lychees, is that pre processing? I took 12 lbs.of sweet and juicy variety and came up with about 7 lbs of juice/pulp.

    Also will acid blend make a wine more dry? I realize lychees are not acidic and don't want the wine too flat.
     
  6. Jun 14, 2011 #6

    docanddeb

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    The fruit measure is after pits, etc removed, usually.
    Acid blend doesn't make wine dry... just gives it interest instead of tasting "flat". Tannin is used for body and I guess it also helps in clearing. You could use 5# for a gallon... save the other 2# to add along with the sugar after it is all finished and stabalized. Do you have Campden tablets (or Potassium Metabisulfite) along with Sorbate to add after it is all finished?
    Do you have a hydrometer? You'll need that to determine your Starting Gravity (SG). An acid test kit is good too... cheap, but you can probably go by what the recipe says if you don't have one.
    You'll need to sanitize all your equipment before adding anything. You can do that with a solution of Campden (Kmeta).

    We all wish you great success!

    Debbie
     
  7. Jun 14, 2011 #7

    FlTropical

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    Thanks,

    In that case I will pull 30 lbs more lychees out and get to preparing.

    I got the entire kit locally, I cannot paste links yet (too new). I have all of those items and then some. It came with a basic book, although I understand most of the process so far (all the hydrometer scales need some more work for me though in how many ways they are interpreted).

    In that recipe, if I wanted to skip the tannin what do I substitute it with? More acid blend, and if so how much?

    Umm, I can determine starting gravity when it is still in primary fermentation? I thought I had to do it once I move it over to the carboy. Please be gentle I am new to this great hobby.

    The funny part is I picked 8 gallons of elderberry today, since that is my second batch waiting in line after the lychee is on its way. Many many many thanks.
     
  8. Jun 14, 2011 #8

    1ChuckGauthier

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    The more pounds of fruit you add to the receipi, the better the wine will taste, I try to use 8 lbs per gal. 1.085 will give you more fruit taste than 1.090 or more. You get your specific gravity # by testing your must in initial set up. Add fruit, sugar water etc then measure.........good luck

    this year I am going to try blackberry by freezing my berries, crushing them when thawed and use only juice approx 6 gal to make my wine. Will save the crushed berries to make another batch which will likley have less flavor.
     
  9. Jun 14, 2011 #9

    Luc

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    I have made lychee wine from canned lychees.

    You can find my recipe here:
    http://wijnmaker.blogspot.com/2008/08/lycheewijn-litchiwine.html

    I made it twice and both times it was deliscious.

    Fresh lychees will even be better.

    Use about 5 kilo lychees per 10 liter, this will give a full flavored wine with body
    5 Kilo Means peeled and no piths.

    Luc
     
  10. Jun 14, 2011 #10

    roadwarriorsvt

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    Of course I'll argue that Hawaii has the best lychee! :h I've got a kaimana and two Emperor trees that are first generation from China. Here is the recipe, found on the net, that I used to make a 5 gallon batch. Its a very simple written recipe though. I'd suggest a bare minimun of 5# of peeled, de-seeded lychee meat per gallon of wine. I didn't know about F-pacs when I made this and is still has a great lychee flavor.

    1

    Begin heating the water. Peel the lychees and remove the stone. Chop the remaining fruit and add it to the sugar in the primary container. Pour in enough boiling water to make one gallon of liquid and stir until the sugar is dissolved. Allow the mixture to cool to room temperature.

    2

    Add the remaining ingredients. Note the requirement for additional tannin for lychee wine because this fruit is not acidic enough by itself. Cover the primary container with a cloth.

    3

    Allow the mixture to stand undisturbed until it is fermenting vigorously. Stir it each day for five days.

    4


    Strain the liquid through a nylon sieve into the secondary container and fit an airlock. The pulp now may be discarded. Rack every 30 days until the wine clears and does not drop any sediment. This step is especially important for lychee wine.

    5

    Stabilize the wine and sweeten to taste if needed. Wait 10 days to ensure that fermentation has stopped before racking into bottles.

    Things You'll Need
    1 gallon water
    5 lbs fresh lychees
    2 1/2 lbs fine sugar
    1/4 oz citric acid
    1 tsp yeast nutrient
    1/4 tsp tannin
    Chablis wine yeast


    Read more: How to Make Lychee Wine | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_2121513_make-lychee-wine.html#ixzz1PESQrHju


    The champagne yeast is a good choice although I've learned that the Cotes Des Blanc is a great fruit wine yeast. I's also suggest freezing the peeled de-seeded lychee for a few days, let it fully thaw, then proceed with the recipe.

    Also, how sweet the wine is will depend on you. It will ferment dry. You will need to add sorbate, them backsweeten to your taste. If the wine will age for any length of time, it will get a little sweeter with age, so don't over-do it when you backsweeten.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2011
  11. Jun 14, 2011 #11

    Runningwolf

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    Ok I admit it! I never heard of Lychee until this thread popped up. Sounds like it is a tropical fruit. Talking about peeling and removing a pit, is this like a peach?
     
  12. Jun 14, 2011 #12

    FlTropical

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    One could look at it like a red bumpy peach in that it has a single stone and has a sub acid flesh some having more juice than others. Skin is inedible, you peel it off (easy since it is thin) and there are dozens of varieties, the largest being a little larger than a golf ball.

    As for the best lychees, I picked a combination of sweetheart and the rarest lychee I know: No Mai Che' (rare in the states at least). These yield more acid than most, more juice and less flesh. If one wanted to make this easy they could pick Hak Ip and Emperor which have a tiny stone and much flesh although in my opinion not juicy enough.
     
  13. Jun 14, 2011 #13

    FlTropical

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    I picked up Cote Des Blanc today as it looks to fit my requirements much better. Any advice on replacing the tannin with acid blend or citric acid? What would be the general result?
     
  14. Jun 14, 2011 #14

    FlTropical

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    Last question before I get started later tonight (I hope). I have only found 3 lychee wine recopies, 2 say to use cold maceration one says hot water extraction. What is the difference when using lychees? I suppose they are best compared to a grape/peach.
     
  15. Jun 14, 2011 #15

    docanddeb

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    I would go by the recipe posted above from someone that has actually MADE it!! The rest of us are just going by the standard in winemaking!!

    You can leave the tannin out if you want. The old fashioned or "natural" way would be to brew some really strong black tea to use in place of some of the plain water. You'll get some tannin that way. It's all a matter of preference, though... in everything related to wine. One will swear it only works one particular way... and the next will say the exact opposite. Most fruits also vary by growing region, so even though we are all talking the same fruits, the handling might be different.

    On elderberries...

    Make sure you get only the blackest, ripest ones. If they are the slightest bit greenish... the wine will be bitter.
    Luc posted above... go to his blog and scroll down for English. He has a great deal of information on elderberries. It's also important to get off the tiny stems that will stick.
    Luc's blog is another great site to bookmark. He's got so much interesting stuff there... and really strives to explain the "why" in winemaking. Some of it is over my head, but it's still interesting just to glance through those.

    Good Luck!

    We can't wait to hear how it goes!

    Debbie
     
  16. Jun 15, 2011 #16

    FlTropical

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    Thanks Debbie, looking forward to the experience. I have the sugar, fruit and water cooling down now. Once it gets down to room temp I will check the SG and see how close it is to 1.085. I printed out a neat little wine batch ledger that lets you keep notes on what you did and how it turned out.
     
  17. Jun 15, 2011 #17

    FlTropical

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    Acid looks like 6 on the PH test. That is before the citric acid (just fruit, sugar and water). Adding the 1.5 oz of citric acid won't push that too acidic will it? Thanks.

    Edit: After acid it is in the 3-4 range according to the generic PH test papers.

    I ended up at a SG of 1.095 :/ I hope that works out ok.
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2011
  18. Jun 15, 2011 #18

    roadwarriorsvt

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    I'm looking forward to your updates. The lychee wine I made was my first batch ever. I made a few typical beginner mistakes with it. I still consider myself a novice wine maker since I have only made 5 batches so far, so I can't really give much advice due to my limited experience.

    I would highly recommend making a skeeter pee from the lychee slurry! :dg
     
  19. Jun 15, 2011 #19

    FlTropical

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    Yay, I see progress. Since adding the yeast last night (10PM+-), I got up at 6AM this morning and it is bubbling away, making popping sounds and has a foam building up on top. I hope 1 gallon of head space is enough :)

    I stirred it gently using a sanitized plastic spoon. Do I need to be gently or agitate it? My book says to stir the primary fermenter 2-3 times per day. Thanks for all the guidance.
     
  20. Jun 16, 2011 #20

    roadwarriorsvt

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    At this early stage, the yeast need some O2 to flourish.
     

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