Liquid Oak extract

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Bmd2k1

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curious if anyone uses Liquid oak extract in any of their wines?

If yes... which vino types and can ya share any tips/tricks?


Cheers!
 

heatherd

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I don't, I use oak powder, chips, cubes, and spirals.
 

Rice_Guy

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Oak extract might be good if you are bench testing different levels of oak. But I use cubes.
you can create your own extract(s) with grain alcohol, I have wondered what BSG (France) and Sinatin (Canada) actually have in them. Scott Labs has a commercial kit for bench trials with their entire product line.
 

Paulietivo

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I haven't used it specifically but I have used super smoother which contains a small packet of it. In all the wines I used it in were mostly reds. It kind of makes them all taste similar but I haven't gotten any complaints about them. I've added this to some of my favorites but remember this is a small amount for 6 gallons. I wouldn't add any more than this.
 

Rockymtn

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curious if anyone uses Liquid oak extract in any of their wines?

If yes... which vino types and can ya share any tips/tricks?


Cheers!
Hi, Yes... I use liquid oak... and was warned that it only takes a few drops to make a difference. I use frozen skins and stems to give body and am working with the oak liquid just recently to try vs Oak chips. I made one batch of Zinfandel, but I didn't realize that the oak liquid bottle didn't have a dribble top and it poured in about 1/3 of the small bottle of oak. The result was quite pleasing... came out something like the California wine "Smoking Loon" with a heavy burnt oak barrel taste to the wine... great if you like that kind of thing. I am trying to do more tests but have to wait with age. At 6 months, my wine kits with the liquid oak have a very good flavour with the skins added to the fermentation process. I'm going to try a port style Cabernet using the liquid oak for a quick treat come the new year. Best of luck!
 

Bmd2k1

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Hi, Yes... I use liquid oak... and was warned that it only takes a few drops to make a difference. I use frozen skins and stems to give body and am working with the oak liquid just recently to try vs Oak chips. I made one batch of Zinfandel, but I didn't realize that the oak liquid bottle didn't have a dribble top and it poured in about 1/3 of the small bottle of oak. The result was quite pleasing... came out something like the California wine "Smoking Loon" with a heavy burnt oak barrel taste to the wine... great if you like that kind of thing. I am trying to do more tests but have to wait with age. At 6 months, my wine kits with the liquid oak have a very good flavour with the skins added to the fermentation process. I'm going to try a port style Cabernet using the liquid oak for a quick treat come the new year. Best of luck!
Thanks for the feedback. I'm looking to just use a small amount in some dry Rose as a variety -- and to save time from my typical use of Oak Spirals in extended aging...which won't be happening in this instance.

Do you notice much change in oak flavor over time or does it remain pretty consistent?

Cheers!
 

vacuumpumpman

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I make my own oak extract by adding alot of toasted oak chips with vodka in a mason jar and shake daily for 2 weeks. Once it is made up it can sit for a long time prior to using. Then do bench trials and add accordingly.
 
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Stavin oak beans and vodka works well enough for bench testing. If you're using a small bottle, like an eyedropper bottle, the beans will probably have to be split to fit through the opening. It takes a week or so for extraction. If left to sit for a couple of years the solution takes on the color from the wood. Looks like well aged bourbon.

One drop on the tongue and you'll know the true meaning of "over-oaked."
 

Rockymtn

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Thanks for the feedback. I'm looking to just use a small amount in some dry Rose as a variety -- and to save time from my typical use of Oak Spirals in extended aging...which won't be happening in this instance.

Do you notice much change in oak flavor over time or does it remain pretty consistent?

Cheers!
I think that it is fairly consistent, although it is early in my trials to really know... I can't seem to age wine for more than a year right now due to Covid forced consumption levels to deter any viruses from ... you know.
Anyway, it seems to be something to play with, and an Oaked Rose is an interesting concept I haven't explored yet. I did take the zest from 3 organic oranges and put them in a Chardonnay (non Oak) with some coriander seeds and dry skins though. Came out a pale orange scented rose with lavender and orange hints. Added tannins to keep it dry. Will be playing with more fruits to temper the whites or roses that I drink. Have fun, be healthy, consume reservatrol.
 

bakervinyard

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FWIW, I just finished a Blackberry Port Style Wine. I added 20ml. Of liquid oak to 3 gallons of the wine. I think it was just what was needed to put the port style wine over the top. I bottled it tonight and will let it age until the holidays.
Thanks, Bakervinyard
 
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