Japanese beetle killer

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Cynewulf

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A few weeks ago I found an assassin bug on my patio table and took him over to my vineyard and laid him on a leaf next to a few Japanese beetles that were mating. Came by a few minutes later and was well satisfied to see he wasted no time turning one of them into lunch. As you said, I just need an army of them now.
 

bstnh1

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The problem with both Sevin formulations is that they also kill bees. But, not a problem if what you're spraying is not in bloom.
 

Dennis Griffith

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The problem with both Sevin formulations is that they also kill bees. But, not a problem if what you're spraying is not in bloom.
You are right there. I take precautions to keep bees clear when I spray. One thing I do is mow the vineyard short during the day to rid it of those sweet clover flowers that they love and then I spray in the late evening while they are not so active. Nothing else in the vineyard (here) to attract them while I spray, but I do watch their activity and spray accordingly. By the time sweet clover starts presenting blooms, it's safe for them to show up. I have an orchard as well and like to keep the honey and mason bees around. Mason bees are great pollinators, but you just need to make sure all outside receptacles (yeap, in the barn too) have covers cause those little buggers fill every hole (~1/4") with mud and larvae and they love those little ground plug holes.
 

Bkat

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Sevin (Carbaryl) is considered highly toxic to bees. Even if they don't die directly it can alter their foraging patterns and they may likely retreat and not return since there will be some residual effect. Since Sevin is a broad spectrum insecticide that, according to the manufacturer, kills 500 kinds of insects including many beneficials (including earthworms), it will significantly disrupt any natural biota that exists in your vineyard.
 

Dennis Griffith

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Sevin (Carbaryl) is considered highly toxic to bees. Even if they don't die directly it can alter their foraging patterns and they may likely retreat and not return since there will be some residual effect. Since Sevin is a broad spectrum insecticide that, according to the manufacturer, kills 500 kinds of insects including many beneficials (including earthworms), it will significantly disrupt any natural biota that exists in your vineyard.
The Garden Tech Sevin has no Carbaryl. It is based on Zeta-Cypermethrin. I have plenty of earth worms and many bees. I must add that I am meticulous when applying sprays in that I don't just blast the area like some vineyards do. I haven't used Carbaryl in a while. Don't know why Garden Tech calls their stuff Sevin, but they do.
 

wood1954

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This year I chose not to spray, so far I’ve picked a little over 1600 beetles and the damage to the vines isn’t bad at all. It takes about 20 minutes to walk the vineyard. If I wasn’t retired I’d be spraying insecticide. It seems like the insecticide works like a repellent, when I sprayed last year the bugs stayed away, by picking them off I feel I’m helping reduce next year’s beetles
 

Bkat

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The Garden Tech Sevin has no Carbaryl. It is based on Zeta-Cypermethrin.
As well as bifenthrin. Problem is, it is still a broad spectrum pesticide and with a half-life up to eight months, it's residual effects can have serious unintended consequences. When wood1954 states that it "seems like the insecticide works like a repellent" it is actually lingering toxicity. This would also carry through on any fruit subject to the spray and as it is moderately toxic to mammals, being a mammal myself, this would also be a concern.

I'm no friend to Japanese beetles and we spend a lot of time hand picking which does also help reduce future generations. But the best method to help control them is beneficial nematodes which predate the beetles at the larval stage. Kaolin clay does help some as a repellent in the mature stage but it needs to be re-applied.
 

dwhill40

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I catch the beetles early when they do the pheromone cluster thing on the vine tops and spot spray sevin. The spraying is minimal. I've seen assassin bugs, spiders, and preying mantis since.
 

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