Is this an old muscadine vine?

Discussion in 'Grape Growing & Vineyard Forum' started by SomaWine, Feb 11, 2019.

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  1. Feb 11, 2019 #1

    SomaWine

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    I found this today on a walk near what appeared to be what was left of an old demolished home. This is in NE SC close to this coast. The vine was growing a few hundred feet from a very long pond and just on the other side of that is a very large river. The bark makes me belobel it's a muscadine, as well as the location. I'm new to this whole thing, I'm wondering if it's possible to transplant it, or if it's more than one, them.
     
  2. Feb 11, 2019 #2

    SomaWine

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  3. Feb 13, 2019 #3

    Lando545

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    that area seems like it would be beautiful in spring! it could be a Muscatine like you said. Possible to transplant, i think so. will it be easy? Probably not. If I was you I would just come back at different times of the year and document it's beauty and progress, capture some high quality images and get them printed.
     
  4. Feb 14, 2019 #4

    GreginND

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    You would be best to propagate the vine from cuttings. Transplanting a vine rarely produces a strong viable vine because you are cutting off all those old long roots.
     
  5. Feb 14, 2019 #5

    Sage

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    Don't wait to do it. Come back in a couple weeks and the place might be bulldozed and a condo being built.
     
  6. Feb 17, 2019 #6

    KevinL

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    I would caution against stealing someone else's plant, even if they don't know that what they have is special.
     
  7. Feb 17, 2019 #7

    garymc

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    Muscadines are very difficult to propagate by cuttings. You need a misting bed and the cutting would be taken in the summer. If one of the shoots coming off it is in the ground, that would be a lot easier. But you would have a lot of nerve, trespassing and taking a plant, unless there's a lot you haven't mentioned. The vine looks to be right next to a post. Is it part of an arbor?
    edit: Yes, it looks like a muscadine.
     
  8. Mar 13, 2019 #8

    John Pichnic

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    I've been eye-balling some old wild ones in vacant lots in my neighborhood. I read that they do well air layering. I like the idea of growing natives because I live in an extremely humid area, but I am also interested in Carlos and Cowart. Any advice?
     
  9. Mar 17, 2019 #9

    AlaJim

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    I've worked with muscadines for years and some of my best vines started out as sections of roots from an abandoned vineyard. Others resulted from sections of runners that had layered themselves. Others yet were propagated from clippings. The most successful of all were the layered runners.

    Look on the ground under the vine and you'll likely find something (a runner) going to ground that is attached to the vine's stem or elsewhere. A slight tug like pulling out a weed should reveal tiny roots growing off the runner. Clip a piece of it off that includes three above ground nodes and as many roots as convenient. Plant the rooted part in a pot with soil from your place and give it plenty of water. In a few months, you'll see what kind of vine you have.
     
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