Hydraulic Corker

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Giovannino

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Does anyone use a hydraulic corker?
What are mechanics behind one of these things? I mean how easy would it be to build one?
 

Runningwolf

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There was a guy on here a few years back selling pneumatic corkers that he made using the Portuguese floor corker. He wanted an astronomical price for it.
 

Wade E

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Someone at one point here was selling them or at least the kit to mount o a Port. corker. I beleve it was like $175 or something. Its just a matter of finding n actuating arm with the right throw and then welding or drilling and bolting the arm in the right spot. Im sure you would have to propably reinforce some areas so that there is no side to side slack.
 

Tom

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Wade,
Go back to fishing.. :fsh
 

Giovannino

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Thanks guys.
Maybe I should look-up pneumatic instead of hydraulic!!
 

Rocky

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I am a tinkerer and I am trying to rig a pedal on my Italian floor corker to push down the bottle support with my foot. I have not been successful so far but it is keeping me busy.
 

JohnT

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We converted a lever action floor corker to a pneumatic one about a year ago. We attached a linear actuater to the lever. We had a single air switch that launched the actuator lever when pressed, and returned the actuater when released. (I'll have to get you guys a picture).

so, here are my thoughts on the subject, having already made one.


1) I can NOT stress just how dangerous this machine can be. I first used mine while hosting a bottling party. I was easily distracted. The corker was connected to 90 psi and ended comming down on my hand. Luckily it only took out a bit of the webbing between my two middle fingers. It could have done MAJOR dammage to my hand.

2) I STRONGLY recomend that you do NOT use a foot switch! If you happen to kick that switch by mistake, you WILL end up in the hospital. I ended up putting TWO hand switches on mine. This way BOTH hands are needed to activate the corker.

3) I also disignated one person as owner of the corker. He is the only one to use it, and since I host the bottling parties, he does not get distracted and can stay focused.

4) I am not sure of the reason you have for wanting a hydrolic corker. I made one up simply for the "Coolness Factor". It was expensive, and does not really cork a bottle faster or better than just a good level corker.
 

roblloyd

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I could see this being scary to use. Unless you had an automatic cork dispenser and bottle holder things could get out of control quickly!
Unless you can control speed somehow I don't think this is something I would try and I'd be the 1st one in line for it.
 

Giovannino

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We converted a lever action floor corker to a pneumatic one about a year ago. We attached a linear actuater to the lever. We had a single air switch that launched the actuator lever when pressed, and returned the actuater when released. (I'll have to get you guys a picture).

so, here are my thoughts on the subject, having already made one.


1) I can NOT stress just how dangerous this machine can be. I first used mine while hosting a bottling party. I was easily distracted. The corker was connected to 90 psi and ended comming down on my hand. Luckily it only took out a bit of the webbing between my two middle fingers. It could have done MAJOR dammage to my hand.

2) I STRONGLY recomend that you do NOT use a foot switch! If you happen to kick that switch by mistake, you WILL end up in the hospital. I ended up putting TWO hand switches on mine. This way BOTH hands are needed to activate the corker.
Point #2 is very important. Having started years ago as a tool and die maker apprentice, the safety factor is top-most in my mind. Therefore that two-hand switch operation is important. The other safety side is to not only wear safety glasses but to actually have a guard between the bottle and the body - bottles can explode.

The reason I originally asked about this is because my BoP used a hydraulic/pneumatic corker and I wondered how easily one could manufacture a simple one.
 

Runningwolf

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I suggest if you're going this big buy a good one. I use a pneumatic one at work that is foot actuated. I try to remember to always take my hand off the bottle when inserting the cork also for safety reasons. Sometimes though when you get going and are doing hundreds of bottles one right after the other you forget and this is when accidents happen. Good points brought up.
 

Lurker

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Giovannino, you have the best name I have ever heard. What is BoP?

Richard L.
 

Giovannino

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Giovannino, you have the best name I have ever heard. What is BoP?

Richard L.
Hi Richard, Wade has answered the BoP question - thanks Wade.

Now that's a first about the name - wow!

Actually, I don't know if you know, it is like saying little (young) Giovan(ni) or Antonino (little Tony), Giuseppino (little Joe).

In Italy this happens often. It is not the actual given name - it's like Mikey for Mike (as in the now famous - "[ame="http://youtu.be/34wJt3pRY0w"]Give it to Mikey[/ame]" click to see advert on you tubeless.
 
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I have bottled over 7,000 bottles in a few months by hand using a Italian floor corker. I wouldn't try modifying it with anything as already mentioned, it's dangerous. I work nights at a machine shop and still would rather just pull the lever myself. :p Although, I could see the older crowd having trouble with them. They are not easy to operate for any period and that is why we built a stand that raises the corker up 6" or so. I am young enough that doing 1500 bottles in a day doesn't bother me.
 

Rice_Guy

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John, curious what pneumatic cylinder you used? force required?
We converted a lever action floor corker to a pneumatic one about a year ago. We attached a linear actuater to the lever. . . . . 1) I can NOT stress just how dangerous this machine can be. . . . 4) Coolness.
Have dialogued with @salcoco this winter about a pneumatic corker, or a next generation vacuum corking tool.
Pushing the pencil and asking PHD google About pneumatic cylinders I am wondering what force it takes to push a cork into a bottle? Do you have a parts list? Drawings of parts placement /calculations for how much force the lever was delivering?

John, I appreciate your caution about safety or as I sometimes say child proofing pilot plant equipment!
 

Sage

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I think raising the corker and fixing it permanently to the floor or a platform would go a long way to making it easier to use.

Less bending over and less chance it moves without having to put a foot on it. Mine will get these mods before it's next use.
 

vacuumpumpman

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I came up with this corker last week - It is extremely cool - BUT IS VERY DANGEROUS !!
There are many pre-cautions that need to be in place prior to using this

I did not use a foot pedal as others have mentioned. It does take alot of force to compress and push a cork into a bottle.

 
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