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How to tell if your carboy is Italian

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Ktaylor

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Hi! We are new to wine making and bought a bunch of used stuff in the hopes to make it cheaper for us.

I have an issue. We have 4 carboys. One says Italian, one says Mexico and two don't say words. Lol.

We had to buy brew belts because our room is a little chilly for fermentation. But they say to only use with Italian carboys.

How do you tell them apart?? The two we don't know have a funny design on the bottom of them. I'm hoping I uploaded the picture properly.

IMG_9868.jpg
 

Stevelaz

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Usually the bottom will say its made in Italy..
 

Floandgary

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Dunno for sure, but that looks like a large "I" inside the emblem.
 

Ktaylor

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Yeah the bottom of the other two said but these two don't.
 

Ktaylor

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It definitely is an I on the bottom. Just wasn't sure if that means it's Italian or not
 
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Ktaylor

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Interesting. Thanks Tom! I guess we will be going to buy some new carboys haha
 

pip

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You could use a plastic bucket for the initial fermentation which as far as i know is the more temperature sensitive phase. Use the glass carboy for the secondary, after fermented to dry? Just an idea.
 

Ktaylor

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We do have them in plastic primary containers but the room gets so cold that I think we will have to use it for all stages. The room is only 17C/62F and is our only option to keep our pets and kids out of the way lol
 

pip

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Well, i'd defer to more experienced wine makers, but 62F may be ok for a secondary, especially if you've fermented to dry. It may also depend on what type of wine you're making. I have read in several places that the warmer the secondary fermentation the more degassing is required so a cooler secondary phase may have some advantages.
 

hounddawg

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very N.E. Arkansas in the instep of MO, BOOTHILL,,
check the thickness of the necks, and thump the sides of the carboys, Chinese carboys are noticeable thinner then Chinese and Mexican carboys, just compare empty weights and neck thickness on your carboys, beings you have a known Italian carb oy to compare with, I have 14 Italian carboys not a one says Italy , but every one has that same swirly pattern on bottom of them, I bought all mine new from reptile dealers , it will be easy to see if any are from china, from china are thin, break easy , bought any carboy is good in my book except Chinese,
I hope this helps
Dawg
 

bkisel

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The three I've bought came in boxes labeled "Made in Italy" and marked, the boxes, as 23L. [Unfortunately one of the three broke several years ago and I'm down to only two.]
 

wineforfun

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My Italian carboys look like this......



The Mexican carboys do not look like this. :)
Italian, Mexican, Chinese, etc., don't care what that carboy is but I won't one, two, three NOW.
 

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