Hop Wine?

Discussion in 'Special Interest Wines' started by BernardSmith, Sep 5, 2018.

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  1. BernardSmith

    BernardSmith Senior Member

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    Has anyone on this forum ever made a hop wine? CJJ Berry suggests 3 oz of hops /gallon. That sounds to me like a lot of hops. He also suggests to boil the hops for 60 minutes and that sounds to me like a way of extracting most of the alpha acids rather than the flavor. My thinking is 2 oz and a ten minute boil. Thoughts? Thanks
     
  2. Vinobeau

    Vinobeau Member

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    A few years ago, I mad a carrot / hop wine. It was ok, but would have been better without the carrots! I only used 1/2 ounce of hops per gallon. I didn't boil the hops, just added boiling water to the must.
     
  3. BernardSmith

    BernardSmith Senior Member

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    Thanks Vonobeau, I think that that is what brewers might call adding hops at flameout. What I am going to use honey as the fermentable and aim for a low ABV mead - around 1.5 lb of honey and I think I am going to work with 2 oz but what I may do is boil 1 oz for 10 minutes and add the second ounce at flameout, then remove the hops after about 5 minutes.... Do you recall how long you let the hops themselves stay in the must?
     
  4. Vinobeau

    Vinobeau Member

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    The hops as well as the carrots were in for 6 days.
     
  5. BernardSmith

    BernardSmith Senior Member

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    That did not create a very vegetative taste? Brewers add hops for - what? 60 minutes (15 minutes and zero minutes) while boiling and then presumably remove them either before the wort cools or just before they transfer the wort from the kettle to the fermenter (so within about 30 minutes after flame out)... Dry hopping might allow hops to sit in the alcohol for up to about 6 days.. But allowing the hops to sit in the must then wine for a week seems to me to be very risky.
     
  6. AkTom

    AkTom Supporting Members Supporting Member

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    I dry hopped a beer once for 22 days. I got called to work a week early. It was in the fermentation chamber, so at 62*. It turned out great. I worried for nothing. I have never used hops in wine.
     
  7. BernardSmith

    BernardSmith Senior Member

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    So here's my recipe and my protocol.
    1 oz of Citra
    1 oz of Centennial
    1.5 lbs clover honey
    Water to make a must with a gravity of 1.058 (so about 1 US gallon)
    1 oz of ginger (grated)
    1 lemon zest and juice
    1/4 t nutrient
    1/4 t tannin
    Yeast EC 1118

    Method:
    Boiled about 3/4 gallon of spring water and when it reached a rolling boil added the hops tied in a muslin cloth.
    Boiled hops for 10 minutes.
    Removed the bag and poured the hop tea into my fermenter (plastic bucket).
    Used unboiled water to help clean out the honey from the containers and used the remaining water to fill the fermenter up to the mark I use as my gallon mark (slightly more than a gallon as I want to fill a gallon carboy to use as my secondary so the primary must always have more must than my target volume.
    Added grated ginger
    Added zest and juice
    Covered bucket and allowed to cool overnight.
    Rehydrated yeast 15 minutes, added a little of the must to bring the temperature of the yeast down and acclimatize the yeast
    Pitched the yeast.
    Covered fermenter with cloth.
    Returned about 4 hours later and saw that the yeast was active.
    Added nutrients
    Added tannin
    At this time my plan is to allow this to ferment 1 week and then check gravity. If the gravity is below 1.010 I will add enough sugar to bring gravity to 1.010 and bottle and store in fridge. If gravity is above 1.010 will monitor and when hits the target gravity will bottle. Storage in fridge will short term allow this to be both "sweet" and carbonated but this will need to be consumed within a couple of weeks.

    Tasting notes: Last night this was VERY hoppy (not bitter, but hoppy), This afternoon the hop flavors had quietened down and the flavors were far more pleasant. Hoping that the ginger and zest will help balance the hops, as will the residual sweetness from the honey.
     

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