Hog panel wine rack project/strage totes

Discussion in 'Wine Cellar & Storage Forum' started by jswordy, Apr 18, 2012.

Wine Making Forum

Help Support Winemaking Talk by donating:

  1. Apr 18, 2012 #1

    jswordy

    jswordy

    jswordy

    Wonderful WINO

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2012
    Messages:
    4,573
    Likes Received:
    3,735
    Hog panel wine rack project/storage totes

    FWIW...

    As many of you know, I am cheap! :)

    So I am going to make this (retail $129.95)...

    [​IMG]

    ...out of two of these hog panels ($15-$19 each at farm supply stores)...

    [​IMG]

    You can get these panels as cattle panels (48" high) or hog panels (40" I think), but with the wires spaced evenly all the way from top to bottom (the pic shows them with close-spaced wires at the top, which would be the bottom when installed). Two panels should be right at 120 bottles of wine, and they will hold the 750 ml and also larger bottles.

    While mine won't look like this, here's a pic off Google Images of one a guy built...

    [​IMG]

    I am not as concerned about appearance as capacity. Stay tuned!

    BTW, if you are storing your wine in a crawlspace or a root cellar open to the crawlspace or anywhere else it might be getting dirty, Wally World has Rubbermaid totes for $12 that will hold 50+ bottles laid on their sides. Latch the cover and you'll not have to worry about dirty bottles. Just be sure to position the tote before you load it. It won't be going anywhere after it's loaded.

    Like I say, FWIW...
     
  2. Apr 18, 2012 #2

    TouronVineyards

    TouronVineyards

    TouronVineyards

    Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2012
    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    1
    I like that idea. What are you planning on using to hold the racks in place? I'm thinking of building a nice wooden frame then putting the hop panels into that. Keep me posted, I'm very intrigued
     
  3. Apr 18, 2012 #3

    jswordy

    jswordy

    jswordy

    Wonderful WINO

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2012
    Messages:
    4,573
    Likes Received:
    3,735
    I have a welder and some metal materials. I can't use wood because the floor of my root cellar (now wine cellar) gets wet in winter. The cellar is under my house. Your wood idea is perfect, though, if used in a dry spot.

    My rack will be stand-alone if it works out. Hope to get on this soon and post pix.
     
  4. Apr 18, 2012 #4

    Runningwolf

    Runningwolf

    Runningwolf

    Super Moderator Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2009
    Messages:
    20,303
    Likes Received:
    2,192
    Jim, I bought the first rack you're showing for about $89. Sinse then I've helped some friends make them with goat panels from tractor Supply. I think the panel was something like 48" x 16'. We just used wood spacers with notches in them to attach the two panels.
     
  5. Apr 19, 2012 #5

    jswordy

    jswordy

    jswordy

    Wonderful WINO

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2012
    Messages:
    4,573
    Likes Received:
    3,735
    EXACTLY! TSC is where I'll get mine, too. I use them all the time around the farm, and have been thinking about doing this for quite awhile. But I have to use metal to connect, since it will be in a wet environment. No biggie.

    Can you post some pix of your attachment arrangement, if you have the time?
     
  6. Apr 20, 2012 #6

    Runningwolf

    Runningwolf

    Runningwolf

    Super Moderator Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2009
    Messages:
    20,303
    Likes Received:
    2,192
    Jim I snap off 4 quick pictures. i hope this helps. As you'll see it really doesn't take much. About 4 1x2's on each side notched out for the wire.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Apr 20, 2012 #7

    Minnesotamaker

    Minnesotamaker

    Minnesotamaker

    Pee Meister

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2010
    Messages:
    1,317
    Likes Received:
    36
    The goat panels pictured look different that the hog panels in an earlier post. The goat panels seem to be spaced pretty efficiently, but the hog panels look like they would use more space per bottle. If bottle density is an issue, you might want to shop around for goat panels.
     
  8. Apr 20, 2012 #8

    Runningwolf

    Runningwolf

    Runningwolf

    Super Moderator Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2009
    Messages:
    20,303
    Likes Received:
    2,192
    Lon, exactly what I thought when I saw the hog panels. The goat panels actually have square holes vs the rectangle holes in the hog panel.
     
  9. Apr 20, 2012 #9

    grapeman

    grapeman

    grapeman

    Administrator Administrator

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2005
    Messages:
    15,186
    Likes Received:
    1,186
    I wonder if the pressure on the panels could ever cause the notched part of the little wood pieces to split off and the panel slip? I think I would use them to space things properly and then use some thin metal bent over an inch or so on each end to wrap around the panels. I would do that in each corner.
     
  10. Apr 20, 2012 #10

    Boatboy24

    Boatboy24

    Boatboy24

    No longer a newbie, but still clueless.

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2012
    Messages:
    12,072
    Likes Received:
    7,247
    Are those panels in the pics painted? If so, how was that done? Thanks!
     
  11. Apr 20, 2012 #11

    Runningwolf

    Runningwolf

    Runningwolf

    Super Moderator Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2009
    Messages:
    20,303
    Likes Received:
    2,192
    Like I said earlier I bought this one. The one I help make we used rollers and brides. Next time I would spray then outside while they were hanging on something. Probably have cardboard or a tarp behind it.
     
  12. Apr 20, 2012 #12

    jswordy

    jswordy

    jswordy

    Wonderful WINO

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2012
    Messages:
    4,573
    Likes Received:
    3,735
    There are three types of panel -- cattle, goat and hog. You can get them with or withoput the small spaces at the bottom, which are used to keep young animals in. I've bought lots and lots and lots of these for the farm. They come galvanized. About $19 a panel, and they go on sale at $17 sometimes. I believe the goat panels are slightly higher priced IIRC. I buy mostly cattle panels.

    The cattle panels have bigger openings, which means you can store bigger bottles if you have the need.

    THANKS for the pics. Mine will have to be freestanding, since my walls are concrete. But it gives me an idea of ways to go. Just another idea I had on my own that I Googled and found out had been done already. LOL...
     
  13. Apr 20, 2012 #13

    Runningwolf

    Runningwolf

    Runningwolf

    Super Moderator Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2009
    Messages:
    20,303
    Likes Received:
    2,192
     
  14. Apr 20, 2012 #14

    TouronVineyards

    TouronVineyards

    TouronVineyards

    Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2012
    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    1
    Looks good! I know what I'm doing next free weekend, thanks for the pics
     
  15. Apr 21, 2012 #15

    gonzo46307

    gonzo46307

    gonzo46307

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2007
    Messages:
    255
    Likes Received:
    0
    Tractor Supply...here I come!!:b

    Peace,
    Bob
     
  16. Apr 21, 2012 #16

    Neviawen

    Neviawen

    Neviawen

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2012
    Messages:
    160
    Likes Received:
    19
    This is a great idea. I've been looking around for affordable wine racks for my crawl space/wine cellar. It's only 40"h x 40"w so one of these would work pretty good. I have cinder block walls behind it so I may need to molly-bolt it to the wall or something so it doesn't tip with the weight of the bottles. Thanks for the pics guys!
     
  17. Apr 21, 2012 #17

    Minnesotamaker

    Minnesotamaker

    Minnesotamaker

    Pee Meister

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2010
    Messages:
    1,317
    Likes Received:
    36
    Have you considered my Skid Row Wine Rack? It's cheap, easy, and can be made to any height you need. You can find the design on the Skeeter Pee website. The link is under: "More Items By Lon" If you click on the actual image a couple of times, it should expand to a larger size which makes it easier to see some of the detail.
     
  18. Apr 23, 2012 #18

    jswordy

    jswordy

    jswordy

    Wonderful WINO

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2012
    Messages:
    4,573
    Likes Received:
    3,735
    You can make the panel rack any size you need, as well, with a pair of bolt cutters.
     
  19. Apr 24, 2012 #19

    Neviawen

    Neviawen

    Neviawen

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2012
    Messages:
    160
    Likes Received:
    19
    I did look at the skid row racks you had on your site and it would have worked good because I know of a place that gives out free skids. My only concern was that in the long run it might not be a good idea to use wood where I want the racks. That area of the basement has known to get damp from time to time and I don't want them rotting. I've had cardboard boxes go moldy and yuck in that closet a few years ago. I since cleaned it out, painted the walls with kilz, and built a platform floor to store anything on. After that I only stored extra pots/pans/ odd kitchen appliances that I had no room for in the kitchen. I know it's not the best spot to store wine but it's pretty much the only area in the house I have to use. To make sure no mold spores get to the corks of my wine I am using wax and a foil wrap on top of the bottles. I hope this is enough to keep them safe. Thanks for the rack idea though. When I get to tractor supply I'm going to pick up some of that fencing :)
     
  20. Apr 24, 2012 #20

    jswordy

    jswordy

    jswordy

    Wonderful WINO

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2012
    Messages:
    4,573
    Likes Received:
    3,735
    I think the easiest way to paint the rack would be to get some cardboard from boxes, lay it down on the garage floor, set the wire on top, then use a medium roller with Rustoleum in your favorite color to do one side. Let it dry, flip, and do the other side.

    Alternately, you could try laying the wire up against sawhorses, painting one side, putting on rubber gloves, swapping the paint side to lean against the sawhorses, and painting the other side. That might be more effiicient. I'd do it outside on grass, which will outgrow any paint stains.

    Please, folks who are doing this, post up your pix if you can. It'll be a bit before I have time to do mine...but it is on the list!
     

Share This Page