Help with identification of 100 year old grape vine and a problem that has developed in the last two years

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Hi,
I was wondering if any one out there can help with the identification of a 100 year old grape vine. To get a sense of the size of it i have attached some photos showing it in the conservatory of our house in the U.K. and a leaf for identification.
The grape vine was planted by my wife's great grandmother and has been going strong producing good crops for wine making until this year when it started to show signs of possible disease.
I have attached photos of the leaves, many which are turning brown at the edges after only 4 weeks from the vine starting to shoot. If any one can shed some light on what variety the vine is and what is causing the leaves to turn brown and how to remedy it, i and my wife would be very grateful. if any more info is required please ask.
Many thanks,
James
 

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Cynewulf

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I’m not sure as it doesn’t look like the typical fungal diseases that I generally deal with but I can help get the discussion started. My four best guesses are: Pierce’s disease (which I understand you don’t have in the UK), sulfur/chemical burn, a nutrient deficiency, or water stress. Have you been spraying the vine with anything?
 

Rocktop

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Have you changed water source or schedule? Looks similar to an issue I had last year with my hard well water. Frequent , small watering built up salinity in the soil.
Also Looks like pierces but I was unaware it is not in UK.
If not water or pierces then probably nutrient issue. Lots of good info on line to match leaf damage to missing nutrients.
RT
 
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Hi,
Thank you for your replies. The vine has not been sprayed with anything. I never use water inside the conservatory to avoid humidity and mould and have a fan which i use on hot days with the windows open to circulate air and keep the temperature between 15 and 22 °C. The vine itself goes out through the wall of the conservatory and into an external soil filled brick planter which has a wooden lid to protect it from frost/cold weather. I was thinking the same thing that it may be water or nutrient issues as the vine has been largely neglected by my elderly parent in laws over the years. However it has always fruited well. I am now watering the external planter every two days with 8 gallons of rain water except when we have wet weather. I am also feeding it with tomato feed once a week and have also pot ashed the soil. Is this regime advisable? Would you do anything differently? Finally any idea of the grape variety from the leaf picture?
Many thanks,
James
 

Cynewulf

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That sounds like too much water for an established vine to me, unless it was showing signs that it was thirsty (wilting leaves or tendrils, etc.). Grapevines don’t need much watering and that one should have roots plenty deep to go find it. It also sounds like it may be too much fertilizer. I’d suggest finding a place to do petiole analysis for you to tell you what your vine needs, if anything. As far as the variety, that’s hard to tell just from the leaf. It looks like vinifera to me and you said you make wine from the grapes. What color are they?
 

NorCal

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I am now watering the external planter every two days with 8 gallons of rain water except when we have wet weather.
We target 5 gallons of water per vine per week for the 8 weeks out of the year that we water; hot climate in Northern California. We also fertilize once per year at the beginning of the year, based on soil/leaf samples.
 
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Hi,
Thanks again for the replies. The grapes are black/purple and seeded. As for the regime of water and fertilizing, i have only been doing this for the past 10 days so will stop. The leaves had started to turn at the edges before i started fertilizing and watering. I would believe that the roots are very deep and run out beneath the lawn so the watering and fertilizing in that one concentrated spot would not have that much of an effect. Still unsure as to why the leaves are turning brown. I will monitor and post some pictures in a week or so. I will see if i can find someone from a local commercial vineyard to come and have a look.
Any more advice or suggestions always welcome.
Thank you,
James
 

efBobby

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James,

I am by no means a professional grape leaf identifier but I will share my opinion regardless.

To me it looks half vinifera and the other part looks to be some type of vitis aestivalis.

given the time line in which the vine was purchased I think it’s possible you might have a real treat called Jacquez.

Which there is much conjecture now that jacquez is actually different from black Spanish and if much more rare!

Some universities here in the states offer grapevine genetic identification services which seem to avg in the $400 USD range.

You may want to check to see if similar services are available in the UK since it’s pretty much the only option you may have to get a definitive id.

best of luck!
 
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