HELP I dropped a carboy...how do I clean the concrete floor?

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LenoreFrost

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I just shattered a carboy of unfinished red wine on the concrete floor of my basement, where I'm doing all of my winemaking. I've swept up the glass, shopvacced and paper-toweled up the worst of the wine, but it definitely soaked into the concrete. I'm mildly concerned about staining, but mostly about the smell and whatever microbes I just permanently introduced to my winemaking space. How do I clean this to get the smell out and prevent problems with my future wines?
 
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Sorry to heard that but it happens. I would consider the stain a work of art and a reminder to be extra special careful. A soap and water cleaning would be fine, just don't use chlorine based product. A good cleaning will take care of the smell and any concern about microbes.
 

LenoreFrost

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I did get really lucky...the carboy actually did cut four of my fingers but it was just very shallow cuts on my knuckles. If it had bounced differently or landed on my feet it would have been a trip to the hospital. I have glass carboys now because that was what I could easily get to get started, but I'll definitely be getting a BrewHauler or milk crates to move my current batches and am looking into alternative container options. I'm too accident-prone for glass.
 

Mike Parisi

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I only started (kit) winemaking in 2019. But from my first equipment kit, I got a PET carboy. It was primarily because of the weight difference. Full carboys, even the PET ones, are really heavy for us older folks, so I didn't want to make it any harder.
 

Khristyjeff

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mikewatkins727

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Started with 1 gal glass carboys and graduated to 3 gallon carboys. Shied away from PET bottles because they collapse under a vacuum from the AllInOne pump. And like those who experienced the problem, I use dollies to move full carboys and the AIO pump for transfers (thank you Steve from AIO).
 
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A little off topic but I just built 3 of these dollies. They are the exact size of 2 milk crates. The other is your standard 18x30 store bought dolly. You can fit 3 carboys on the standard dolly without milk crates. I did it for space saving but its really about the same per carboy. Mine is 169 sq in per carboy and the standard is 180 sq in. I guess the advantages might be it protects the carboys better and moving 2 full carboys in lieu of 3 is a little easier. But I'm still up in the air if it's worth it.
 

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Lukaswine

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Thanks for the advice!!! I'm going to call it a sacrifice to the gods of wine and hope that in return they bless the other carboy from the same batch.
I only started (kit) winemaking in 2019. But from my first equipment kit, I got a PET carboy. It was primarily because of the weight difference. Full carboys, even the PET ones, are really heavy for us older folks, so I didn't want to make it any harder.
Glad to hear you were not seriously hurt. I use what big indoor plants that roll on wheels 554A3817-FC7B-4FBE-8A7C-524743168019.jpegmaking it easier to move without lifting until needed. Less stress on the back.

I purchased my first plastic carboy and oh what a difference!
 

Steve Wargo

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Just a curiosity question. Do those of you who use glass carboys avoid PET carboys for a reason? I've always used PET simply because of the cost and the inherent danger in using a 6 gallon glass container!
I use both PET and glass carboys. I began my wine-making journey using glass carboys that I still own today. I bought all 2nd hand. I cracked the neck of a 1-gallon glass carboy because of my own carelessness. Seems If you slightly bump two glass carboys together bad things can happen. I don't worry about that with plastic. So long term is one better than the other? Glass carboys are proven to last many many years, only if one is very cautious handling them. I think the thicker glass carboys retain steadier internal temperatures vs the PET carboys (I never measured). I have aged some wine for two years in glass carboys with great success. I have more choices with glass carboys. I have 1, 3, 5, 6.5, gallon glass carboys. My PET plastic carboys are all 5-Gallon but weigh much less. The PET carboys are holding up after a year, and have not discolored. I know people that use 5-gal beer kegs to store their wine by adding low pressure gasses thus eliminating the oxygen from the tank. We have choices, the answer is "It depends". Take into account ones health, tight storage space, availability of carboys, budget, and other things not mentioned will usually guide one's decisions. Before glass carboy, there was the wood barrel.
 

wineview

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I did get really lucky...the carboy actually did cut four of my fingers but it was just very shallow cuts on my knuckles. If it had bounced differently or landed on my feet it would have been a trip to the hospital. I have glass carboys now because that was what I could easily get to get started, but I'll definitely be getting a BrewHauler or milk crates to move my current batches and am looking into alternative container options. I'm too accident-prone for glass.
I’m re-posting this photo in case you didn’t see it a few weeks back. I make these carboy carriers from scrap wood and work really well. Then I move them around on dollies both home made and from Harbor Freight. There is a link a few responses down in this thread.


6BC06915-E7BE-4F7A-A7BF-FC5BE9BD088C.jpeg7B20B65C-5DF3-4D62-83B6-C403BBD3C9A8.jpeg
 
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Everything posted so far is a good idea. I avoid moving full carboys, other than sliding them on the counter. Using a pump (vacuum or otherwise) is a smart idea, regardless of age or physical condition.

My basement is concrete floor with vinyl tile -- which is no more forgiving than plain 'ole concrete. I placed workout puzzle mats in places where I need to put carboys (full or empty) on the floor, as a cushion.

workout mat.jpeg
 
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