Growing grapes with sand???

Discussion in 'Grape Growing & Vineyard Forum' started by efBobby, Jul 18, 2019.

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  1. Jul 18, 2019 #1

    efBobby

    efBobby

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    I read that if you use sand the phylexorra will not go after your roots, that true?

    Next does it have to be pure sand or will a mix work?

    Lastly what about a layered mix where you use your high nutrition mix for the lower parts and sand as the upper part?
     
  2. Jul 18, 2019 #2

    CTDrew

    CTDrew

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    Grapevines have a large root system so changing the soil under the plant can’t change the soil type of the vineyard. Naturally sandy soil series are said to fair better than other soil types because sandy soils are poor habitats for them.
     
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  3. Jul 18, 2019 #3

    Masbustelo

    Masbustelo

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    Where are you located? Depending on your geography, it might not be a problem.
     
  4. Jul 18, 2019 #4

    salcoco

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    Hybrids and natural American grapes a re immune to phylexorra. Vinefera are the only one that have a problem. go with grafted don't bother with the sand. there root system can be a deep at 8ft and latrial 8 ft in diameter.
     
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  5. Jul 20, 2019 #5

    efBobby

    efBobby

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    Ah, I live in central va. I remember reading the root pest ate more of western thing but anything to discourage any pest and generates less need of maintenance from me is a good thing.

    The sap suckers are too plentiful for sure. Even the established natives seem to slouch a bit after they get popular enough both the aestivalis and another aestivalis varient I cannot remember off hand not the silver leaf but the other one that starts with L.

    The sap suckers also seem to prefer the fox grape but it does not seem to affect the vine much.

    Sap suckers seem to ignore the riparia but the Japanese beetles seem to prefer it and it seems nothing really affects the muscadines! Lol!

    Vulpina mostly ignored and cinerae seems to be enjoyed by sap suckers.

    Far as the hybrids they are enjoyed the most by black aphids only exception is one hybrid I got locally which the pest seem to find irrestible.

    I can't seem to find the heritage of it online either but it is labeled 'roucanef' and was told it is a French hybrid. They loved it so much they infected it with some sort of top down stem rot. I caught it soon enough and amputated at the first node.

    After which I built a cage with a micro habitat and trapped a ladybug with it for good measure. It is putting out new growth now but will outgrow its cage soon.

    If the fruit is half as good to humans as the sap is to the insects I will be in for a treat IF I can keep it alive!

    Anyone ever heard of a 'roucanef' and know what it taste like and its parentage?
     
  6. Jul 20, 2019 #6

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