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Grape Cuttings one month old

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jtstar

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This is one of the Frontenac grape cuttings that I got started this spring I will now put it in its own pot and let the roots get better establishedal's%20grapes%20003.jpg
 

jtstar

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There are four varieties with a total of about one hundred and twenty cuttings
Frontenac, Brianna, St. Croix, Chancellor
 
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grapeman

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Uh oh, you are on a slippery slope there jstar! (That's how my vineyard began- a few that got out of control).

I put mine in an outside nursery and the roots develop better than in pots. By next year they should have size similar to what you buy as bareroot vines.
 

lloyd

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Great shot jtstar. I have been looking for any escape grapes that might have survived our 6500 ft altitude in the 100 year old mining town of Eureka Nevada yes I'm on the map my first attempt I discovered turned out to be a Virginia creeper It had survived from additional water it had received form the roof of an abandoned 100+ year old Mine forman house a virtual mansion in its time. at 7500 ft on a ridge I was amazed at it' survival but its not a grape I have one more that i remember as a kid my first grade teacher showing me a grape she had grown on her garden Rock she said the rock had save the plant because of the heat it absorbed in the day prevented it from freezing at the critical times in our climate as a farmer child I was Amazed and now this many years later as I have begun to learn this new hobby It Jogged my memory. She has long since died and the old house moved. it was rundown for many years but it had a naturally wet ground and was at the bottom of the canyon the people that restored the yard seem to be doing great from the road and the rock I remember would have been hard to move. I think Ill go today and see if any thing is left of the vine.If it is I would like help in propagating it. could you give me instructions?
 

jtstar

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I am not sure if I can give you the right information on propagating grapes seeing is that I have never done it before. The cuttings where given to me by my brother-in-law so all I had to do was get them to root which I followed instruction from other forum members here which I would like to give my thanks to. What I do know is that you want to start with at least one year old canes then dipped them in a rooting compound then put them in a mixture of vermiculite and peat moss a 3-1 mix if I remember right. Check out the thread cuttings just delivered from vineyard in vineyards and fruit gardens. I got a lot of information from a lady by the name of Desert Dance. Good luck with your vine
Jack
 

lloyd

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This is one of the Frontenac grape cuttings that I got started this spring I will now put it in its own pot and let the roots get better establishedView attachment 883
I'm having a little trouble keeping up with all the forums but getting better. this is the first forum I have ever subscribed to. Thanks for the Help
 

jtstar

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This is one of the Frontenac grape cuttings that I got started this spring I will now put it in its own pot and let the roots get better establishedView attachment 883
Well just an update on how my cuttings are doing my grow tubes are about 24 to 30 inches tall and I have several that are about one foot taller then the tubes I had about a 50% rate on my cutting but there are still some that are rooting in the house but they are coming to an end. :br
 

Deezil

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Great shot jtstar. I have been looking for any escape grapes that might have survived our 6500 ft altitude in the 100 year old mining town of Eureka Nevada yes I'm on the map my first attempt I discovered turned out to be a Virginia creeper It had survived from additional water it had received form the roof of an abandoned 100+ year old Mine forman house a virtual mansion in its time. at 7500 ft on a ridge I was amazed at it' survival but its not a grape I have one more that i remember as a kid my first grade teacher showing me a grape she had grown on her garden Rock she said the rock had save the plant because of the heat it absorbed in the day prevented it from freezing at the critical times in our climate as a farmer child I was Amazed and now this many years later as I have begun to learn this new hobby It Jogged my memory. She has long since died and the old house moved. it was rundown for many years but it had a naturally wet ground and was at the bottom of the canyon the people that restored the yard seem to be doing great from the road and the rock I remember would have been hard to move. I think Ill go today and see if any thing is left of the vine.If it is I would like help in propagating it. could you give me instructions?
Take what i'm about to say with a grain of salt, seeing as how i have absolutely no experience with grape vines...

I've set up cuttings from Fuschia's and tomatoes
*cough* :sm *cough*

The process was similiar in all the cuttings ive done, regardless of the plant...

They sell rooting compounds in both powder and liquid form - the liquid works better but doesnt last as long as the powder. You'll want a 6-9" cutting, and you'll want to put roughly half of it into soil - ie, your new pot, etc - compress the soil lightly. THe object is to form a good bond between the cutting, rooting compound and the dirt, but not injury the cutting. Any air between the fresh cut on the end of the cutting, and the rooting compound will cause the cutting to die off - it was suggested to me from a variety of sources to follow these steps:

1. Make the hole in the soil in your pot, to receive the new cutting
2. Cut the cutting off the plant, remove any branches that will end up in the dirt
3. Submerge the cut-end of the new cutting into clean (whether you prefer distilled, filtered or just plain ol) water. This keeps most of the air at bay, and will make any powdered rooting compound stick.
4. Cover the lower half of the cutting in the rooting compound - if its a liquid, usually a quick dunk in the container will do it
5. Insert the new cutting into the pre-made hole in the soil, careful not to damage the cutting any further, and lightly compress the soil around the base of the plant
6. Dont drench, but water lightly

Make your cuts at a 45-degree angle

If you have access to or can borrow/buy a incubator for your new cuttings - usually consists of a dark plastic bottom and a clear plastic top; they're pretty cheap. Since your new cutting lacks roots, it will survive on water in the air that it can pull through its leaves, so its important to keep it in a humid environment until it has rooted enough to sustain itself - usually a week or two time..

A spray bottle works well to keep the incubator humid enough


Hope to help, good luck with your endeavor
 
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Woodbee

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I am curious as to the best time of year to start cutting of grapes. I would guess that Spring would be best or do you make the cuttings while the sap is still down.
Brad
 

jtstar

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My brother-in-law comes back from Mexico in late March and within the next month he is out pruning his grape vines so I would say that it is best to do it before the sap runs. Then shortly after that you want to callous the cuttings and put in a soil mix to get them to root
 

DesertDance

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Almost all my UC Davis cuttings rooted, but they got attacked by fungus gnats, and I didn't realize that those larvae would kill my cuttings FAST~ By the time I learned how to control them, I lost most of my cuttings. However, at least 20 survived and I've had to get taller stakes because they are all weaving their way into the canopies of the in-ground vines. Most are 2' to 4' tall now.

It's fun to grow cuttings! I've got my UC Davis order in for next year, and this time I will be smarter! I'll dunk with BT from day one!!

Congratulations on your success!
Suzi
 

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