Gentle pumps that can handle must

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JustinTG

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Hi all,

This year, we'll be fermenting in a 300g ibc tote and two 1000L stainless tanks, so I'm starting to learn about the relevant tradeoffs when selecting a pump. I am wondering if there is a pump that could transfer the fermented wine out of the fermenters but also be gentle enough to use 2-4 more times for racking. I don't think transferring the juice off of the skins technically requires a "must pump" but surely it should be able to tolerate some solids.

If anybody has an experience or recommendations, I'd welcome your thoughts.

Of course, the more economical the better.
 

Rice_Guy

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There are leaky pumps and positive displacement pumps.

What is readily available (cost effective) for moving liquids/ beer is a centrifugal design pump (leaky) which can be run on a speed controller to give rate control, tolerates solids/ dirt since it leaks, is cost effective, is available in a variety of materials (stainless) and sizes. The down side is that centrifugal pumps are not self priming, are limited in how much head pressure they produce, and if sealed might be hard to clean/ inspect.

Piston and peristaltic pumps are positive displacement. They tend to cost more, can self prime or for that matter a piston could suck in a supply tank if the relief isn’t working, piston pumps can develop high pressures, they both speed control. Peristaltic pumps have lots of lab uses and small industrial uses like dosing chemicals, I haven’t seen them in factories moving large volumes.
 

BarrelMonkey

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I would recommend looking for a 'flexible impeller' pump - as the name suggests, the wine is moved using flexible (eg rubber) blades in the pump housing. They can be used for pulling off the free run as you suggest, and also in many cases for must. They don't beat up the wine as much as some pump mechanisms.
 

Earldw

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There are leaky pumps and positive displacement pumps.

What is readily available (cost effective) for moving liquids/ beer is a centrifugal design pump (leaky) which can be run on a speed controller to give rate control, tolerates solids/ dirt since it leaks, is cost effective, is available in a variety of materials (stainless) and sizes. The down side is that centrifugal pumps are not self priming, are limited in how much head pressure they produce, and if sealed might be hard to clean/ inspect.

Piston and peristaltic pumps are positive displacement. They tend to cost more, can self prime or for that matter a piston could suck in a supply tank if the relief isn’t working, piston pumps can develop high pressures, they both speed control. Peristaltic pumps have lots of lab uses and small industrial uses like dosing chemicals, I haven’t seen them in factories moving large volumes.
We used paristatic aka rotoflex pumps on submarines a lot. Since the pump never touched the fluid it could used for just about any liquid without contaminating the pump mechanism. But for reasons beyond me, they are very expensive.
 

Bmd2k1

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Hi all,

This year, we'll be fermenting in a 300g ibc tote and two 1000L stainless tanks, so I'm starting to learn about the relevant tradeoffs when selecting a pump. I am wondering if there is a pump that could transfer the fermented wine out of the fermenters but also be gentle enough to use 2-4 more times for racking. I don't think transferring the juice off of the skins technically requires a "must pump" but surely it should be able to tolerate some solids.

If anybody has an experience or recommendations, I'd welcome your thoughts.

Of course, the more economical the better.
wondering what pump you settled on? Does it have a pre-filter?

Cheers!
 

JustinTG

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wondering what pump you settled on? Does it have a pre-filter?

Cheers!
Sorry for the delayed response. A popular online home winemaking retailer suggested the euro 30 with a filter and reducer, which was out of our budget for this year. I'll probably do more research and pull the trigger on something for next year.
 
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I've just bought a euro 30, will try it out this vintage (march, southern hemisphere). Looking to do the same tasks as you, so can let you know how it goes (remind me!)
 

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