Fresh pineapple wine

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Fuzzyface

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Hello, Looking at the overripe pineapples at the market that they are discarding, I thought of making some summer wine for Christmas. I have seen several recipes and different processing. I am a little confused about how to prep the fresh fruit. Some use the the whole fruit skin and all chopped up and brought to a boil with sugar. Some only use the peeled fruit crushed no boiling. I would consider that the boiling would certainly sterilize the skin, and dissolve the sugar, Might add a little color also. Some have problems with the lack of color so the quest begins. Comments appreciated.
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Fuzzyface

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OK, some more input.

1. The use of the skin introduces color and wild yeast potential,
2. The use of Fresh fruit will yield more "natural sugar" than canned.
3. While the fresh requires more work, pictin, etc, there is more natural flavor from the pulp.
4. Both require a lot of hand intervention and possible contamination unless CARE is used, a lot of the videos show no protection with gloves.
5. I would like to know of those who have used a processor on the fresh fruit vs just crushed. The former would certainly produce more extracted juice.
6. I like the use of the total fruit to add color rather than having to result to artificial methods. What say you?

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hounddawg

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i never add color, pineapple takes a long time to clear, from start to bottle i go 2 years, i cut mine up and freeze to break up the cell walls, and use a bunch of pectic enzyme, about double as called for, makes a killer wine, pineapple and lemon both hide the high ABV, i make skeeter pee so i can age my other wines, lol,, the skeeter pee i drink so to not drink my agers ,,, mine is always a light yellow, but you can see the yellow, of course i can care less about color as long as the taste is there, also use more then enough fruit per gallon of fluid, i go both ways water or apple juice, the apple will add color, both are mighty good, i'd go a minimum of 5 lbs per gallon, but prefer 7 lbs per gallon,
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johnnash

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Never made pineapple but seems like a good idea!
All my fruit wines to date have been on whole fruit, crushed and frozen. I also like the idea of back sweetening with juice!
 

Rice_Guy

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Your original post mentioned salvaging over ripe fruit, pineapple can undergo a fairly drastic change of flavor/ quality as it ages.
The pH will rise from mid 3’s for a greenish to mid 4’s when showing browning
the TA can drop from 1.2% to over ripe of 0.2%
 

Fuzzyface

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I should have said when the fruit starts to get soft. So not really over ripe I guess.

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Rice_Guy

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You are suggesting a lot of work!
From a practical point of view, I don’t skin apples or sumach berries (they are really dirty) or grapes (which mom would do making a grape pie) so it works into some of the mineral and nitrogen the yeast metabolize.
In doing gooseberry this week I tasted stemy parts the web suggested to remove and said it will not have an impact, try to taste your pineapple rind to see if the flavor is objectionable to you.
So far, no one has commented on leaving the outer skin on?
 
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RichardC

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Fuzzy, i didn't boil the pineapple, and separated the skins/ cores to ferment separate from the 'prime' bits. The skins, even though all orange, is noticably more acidic ( citric) than the fruit, which I added acid blend to. When doing this again next year, I wouldn't ferment skins separate, everything will be in one..

If the pineapples are cheap or free, do two batches, one with skin/ core in and one with skin and core removed.
 

subseageorge

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Im away to start a batch of pineapple, Is it ok to use the skins and core with the fruit in the primary ? Or do you guys recommend boiling skins and core separate and just add the extracted juice to the primary with the fruit? The last time i did pineapple i discarded the skin and core.
 
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Pineapple does not ripen after harvesting, e.g., it does not get sweeter with time. It does get softer, but you need to watch for rotten spots in the fruit.

I've not made pineapple wine, but have juiced a whole pineapple according to the book that came with my machine. The juice was undrinkably nasty, I threw it out. Based upon that, I'd not ferment the skin.
 

subseageorge

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I have done 3 batches, 4kgs in one primary, 4kgs in another primary , and all the skins and cores in another, covered with fluid, added 2 Campden tablets in each, and covered. lets see what tomorrow brings, as i have seen some wine recipes where you can make wine only from the skins and cores.

Pineapple Peel Wine
Prep Time
10 mins
Brewing time
13 d
Total Time
13 d 10 mins

Delicious, golden, sunset coloured wine made out of pineapple peel. The next time you think of throwing away the peels, stop and make this!
Course: Wines
Servings: 900 ml (approx)
Author: Shireen Sequeira
Ingredients
  • Peel of 1 medium sized pineapple (discard the crown)
  • 3 cups sugar * see notes before proceeding
  • 3 cups potable/drinking water (boiled and cooled water)
  • 1/8 teaspoon yeast
  • 1 egg white well beaten
Instructions
  1. Wash the pineapple thoroughly and pat try with a cloth. Cut & discard the crown and the stem (base)
  2. Transfer the peel into a large (approx 2 litres) glass/ceramic jar and add the water, sugar, yeast, egg white and stir well.
  3. Cover with the lid, do not fasten it (alternatively just cover the mouth of the jar with a thick cloth). Keep undisturbed in a clean, dry place of your kitchen for 3 days.
  4. After 3 days, strain the liquid through a clean muslin cloth into a clean, sterile vessel. Discard the peel and transfer the liquid back into the jar and cover. The wine will be ready for consumption after 10 days.
  5. After 10 days decant (transfer) the wine into a clean, sterile bottle of 1 litre capacity with the help of a funnel. Seal the bottle. Discard the sediment settled at the bottom of the jar.
  6. Place the bottle in a cool, dry place. The wine gets better with age
 

hounddawg

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Pineapple does not ripen after harvesting, e.g., it does not get sweeter with time. It does get softer, but you need to watch for rotten spots in the fruit.

I've not made pineapple wine, but have juiced a whole pineapple according to the book that came with my machine. The juice was undrinkably nasty, I threw it out. Based upon that, I'd not ferment the skin.
I've done a few, and i just froze them,,, then dumped in with P,E, ,, in my ferment barrel,, @winemaker81 stated that pineapple dose not ripen after being plucked, just noticed @winemaker81 post, i did not know that, when I've made pineapple it is like @Rice_Guy stated it is very hard work,
Dawg
 

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