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Forgot aerobic fermentation

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Hey guys,

This is my second time making wine and I was doing it a on a bit of a rush. Long story short, I forgot I should leave it without the airlock for a few days for the primary fermentation. Now it's two weeks later when I realized that.
Can I just remove the airlock and leave it to aerate and do the aerobic fermentation? Should I pitch in more yeast to try and save it?
I measured the SG and it's still 1050. It started with around 1080.

Please help me save my batch!! thank you.
 

mhopkins

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Take heart ... your batch is likely just fine (or is almost surely recoverable).

Primary fermentation (sometimes described as aerobic) will usually last 3-5 days. A significant majority of the fermentation (70% +) will take place during these first few days. During this time the yeast will metabolize a lot of oxygen as it consumes sugars to produce alcohol and CO2. Most wine kits call for an airlock during this phase, but a lot of home winemakers just cover the primary fermenter (I use a bucket) with a loose fitting lid or towel to provide more access to oxygen and to keep stuff from falling into the must.

Secondary fermentation (sometimes described as anaerobic fermentation) is when the remaining fermentation takes place. This can last anywhere from one to two weeks depending on a number of factors (temp, remaining sugars, etc.). Rack the must to a secondary fermenter (I usually use a carboy, though sometime a bucket if I plan to use a lot of oak in secondary) when your hydrometer reads 1.030 – 1.020. At this point you should put the must under an airlock since the amount of CO2 being generated will no longer be sufficient to protect the must. BTW, not all fermentations are alike … some take longer to get to 1.030.

Your SG of 1.050 after 2 weeks may or may not indicate a problem. Be sure your temperature is in range (anywhere from 70-75 s/b fine). And check the SG for the next couple of days to see if it is moving or is static. If static, you have a stuck fermentation. Which is likely salvageable. If stuck, you need to figure out why and then take appropriate steps.
 

mhopkins

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@Jonathan Araujo

Hey guys,
This is my second time making wine and I was doing it a on a bit of a rush. Long story short, I forgot I should leave it without the airlock for a few days for the primary fermentation. Now it's two weeks later when I realized that.
Can I just remove the airlock and leave it to aerate and do the aerobic fermentation? Should I pitch in more yeast to try and save it?
I measured the SG and it's still 1050. It started with around 1080.
Please help me save my batch!! thank you.
BTW - here are a couple of helpful sites if you are indeed stuck:

Top 10 Reasons For Fermentation Failure
https://eckraus.com/wine-making-failure/?_ga=2.140164218.851583875.1563723664-1247566591.1543088158

How To Fix A Stuck Fermentation
https://blog.eckraus.com/how-to-fix-a-stuck-fermentation
 
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@Jonathan Araujo



BTW - here are a couple of helpful sites if you are indeed stuck:

Top 10 Reasons For Fermentation Failure
https://eckraus.com/wine-making-failure/?_ga=2.140164218.851583875.1563723664-1247566591.1543088158

How To Fix A Stuck Fermentation
https://blog.eckraus.com/how-to-fix-a-stuck-fermentation
Thank you so much for the tips @mhopkins . I ended up measuring three followed days and discovering that it was stuck. I followed your advice on the link there and pitched in new yeast. Important to mention that I have not re hydrated the yeast either when I pitched the first package in.
I am being very careful with the sanitation and trying to disturb it as least as possible, so hopefully it will be fine.

Thanks!
 

crushday

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@jonathan araujo, how’s it going? Don’t be afraid to give the must a good long stir. You mentioned being careful ‘trying to disturb it as least as possible’. I don’t think this is a concern. Any trub you stir up will settle back down quickly without negatively affecting the wine. I don’t think you’ll find anyone on here that disagrees with that.
 

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