Fizzy wine

Discussion in 'Forum Comments, Suggestions & Help' started by jeff cooper, Oct 22, 2018.

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  1. Oct 22, 2018 #1

    jeff cooper

    jeff cooper

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    My Amorone wine juice is still fizzy after weeks in the carboy. Have racked twice any suggestions?
     
  2. Oct 22, 2018 #2

    Jal5

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    Needs more degassing I would suspect.
     
  3. Oct 22, 2018 #3

    NorCal

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    Pursue your degas method of choice. My wine can have too much CO2 even after a year, so I always plan to degas under vacuum, unless my wine passes the FIZ test; fill the bottle 1/2 full, thumb over top, shake like crazy, then slowly remove thumb and listen.
     
  4. Oct 23, 2018 #4

    meadmaker1

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    Vacuum degassing is the way to go.
    Fast
    Clean
    Easy
    It requires an investment in a vacuum pump but they work for transfer and filtering too.
     
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  5. Oct 23, 2018 #5

    Bleedaggie

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    You won’t regret buying the all in one pump if for no other reason than this.

    If you just cant swing it, get a brake bleed tool at an auto parts store (or Wal-Mart). The tubing should be the same size as the airlock hole in your carboy stopper. You’ll have to pump it every few hours until you don’t get bubbles anymore when you do.
     
  6. Oct 23, 2018 #6

    Ajmassa5983

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    I’ve got wine over 6 months still with noticeable fizz on the tongue. I view as extra protection as it ages.
    If your trying to go out of your way to degas it other than time and racking, it’s almost impossible to get it all at lower temps. Degas At 75° or above. The difference is like night and day.
     
  7. Oct 23, 2018 #7

    SethF

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    You can degas with a whip and a drill, be careful not to overflow the carboy, or if you have vacuvin stoppers and a pump, put one of the stopper in an airlock top, (without any metabi solution) and pump away. Cheap fix and works.
     
  8. Oct 23, 2018 #8

    pstracy64

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    Drill and degas tool, spin and spin and spin till all gone, then do it again. Then I clear with sparkalloid.
     
  9. Oct 24, 2018 #9

    winemaker81

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    I had not considered the vacuvin -- I expect that works great, but it will be a lot of pumping.

    Like others, I use a powered stirring rod -- costs about $12-$15 USD. I use it with a corded drill to stir any time wine or beer needs stirring. [I found my cordless just doesn't have the RPM's]

    I executed a practical test a few weeks ago -- racked a wine that had recently ceased fermentation into a primary. [stirring in the carboy is extremely dangerous, likely to overflow!] Stirred the wine for 4 minutes, changing direction every 30 seconds. It foamed a lot. Racked it back into the carboy.

    This is a kit where the directions specified adding kieselsol one day and chitosan the next, so the next day I racked it back into the primary, added the chitosan, and stirred for 2 minutes. I got almost no foam. The previous day's stirring appears to have done the job.

    Is this as effective as the all-in-one pump? No idea, but I expect that the pump is as amazing as others have reported.

    But it's a large chunk of change at ~$200 USD to spend on a piece of hardware. It's something to buy if the level of wine making interest is high enough. My thought is to buy the stirring rod first -- it's always going to be useful. Later, if the wine making interest continues to be high and the budget allows, buy the pump.

    BTW: I'm going to try my vacuvin on a degassed wine, to see if I get any bubbles. If there's any significant amount of dissolved CO2, it should produce bubbles as it comes out of suspension.
     
  10. Nov 8, 2018 #10

    masic2000

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    Hi Winemaker, i'm waiting to see if you produced any results with the vacuvin as stated above . . .
     
  11. Nov 8, 2018 #11

    winemaker81

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    I had one batch in fermentation, forgot about the vacuvin and stirred it. In hindsight, given as how stirring works so well (when using a drill mounted stick) I don't think I'm going to bother with the vacuvin.

    Thinking back to how much foam I got from stirring, I expect it would take a LOT of pumping to extract any quantity of CO2.
     
  12. Nov 8, 2018 #12

    masic2000

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    Thanks. I may just stick with the drill too.
     

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