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rob

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I read somewhere that you could use a 50 gal plastic trash can for a primary fermenter, I know it had to be a certain brand, i.e. tuffy or brute, one of those is food save, I just can not find the old thread, it may have been from another forum. I should have my first harvest from my vineyard this fall in hopes of about 50 gal. of juice.
 

Wade E

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The white Brute ones are food grade. Walmart and Home depot sometimes carry them.
 

Tom

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I read somewhere that you could use a 50 gal plastic trash can for a primary fermenter, I know it had to be a certain brand, i.e. tuffy or brute, one of those is food save, I just can not find the old thread, it may have been from another forum. I should have my first harvest from my vineyard this fall in hopes of about 50 gal. of juice.
Waht kind of grapes in your vineyard?
 

rob

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I have 500 vines of Brianna, had a late frost this spring and caused a major set back on about a third of them. They are in their 3rd year.
 

PPBart

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The white Brute ones are food grade. Walmart and Home depot sometimes carry them.
Check with W.W. Grainger for more options -- I've got 32-gallon and 10-gallon gray Brutes that are also food grade.
 

PPBart

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Check with W.W. Grainger for more options -- I've got 32-gallon and 10-gallon gray Brutes that are also food grade.
OOPS! I need to correct my own post -- the gray Brutes are certified to meet NSF Standard 2, which covers equipment commonly known as "fabricated food equipment" (kitchen, bakery, pantry, and cafeteria units, and other food handling and processing equipment including tables and components, counters, shelves, sinks, hoods, etc.). It requires compliance to basic principles of design, construction, and performance necessary for easy cleanability, food protection, and freedom from harborages. I figured that was good enough for primary duty, and have used these for years.
 
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