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Experience with Assmanshaussen?

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skyfire322

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I just picked up the RJS Chilean Trio (Carmenere, Cab Sauv, Malbec) and have been deciding on which yeast to use. I was torn between BM4x4 and D80, but then I came across the AMH Assmanshaussen which sounds pretty intriguing.

I noticed it has a lengthy lag time, but I was curious to see if anyone here has used it before?
 

jgmann67

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I just picked up the RJS Chilean Trio (Carmenere, Cab Sauv, Malbec) and have been deciding on which yeast to use. I was torn between BM4x4 and D80, but then I came across the AMH Assmanshaussen which sounds pretty intriguing.

I noticed it has a lengthy lag time, but I was curious to see if anyone here has used it before?
I used it on a fresh grape OVZ ferment... plowed right through. 8 days and done. Craig @ceeaton had a more typical experience. Weeks to get to zero.
 
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ceeaton

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On a Lanza Zin had a 13 day ferment, but it then blasted through MLF (like two weeks and done). I really like the flavor profile, nice and spicy. Also used it on a Chilean Syrah, like that one too, but it fermented much like @jgmann67's did (normal 5-6 days). Never had too bad of a lag, but it wasn't like it started up in a few hours or anything, more like 24 hours. I think they suggest adding it to 10% of the must till it gets going, then to the balance of the batch. Pretty sure I used some Go-Ferm to rehydrate it with, but nothing other than that out of the ordinary.
 

skyfire322

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Thanks! I was reading the directions, and it says if a short lag phase is desired add it to 10% of the must. Is there any benefit for the shorter lag phase?
 

stickman

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Probably not much different under normal conditions, some might argue that a slower start could be a benefit for adding complexity. On the other hand, short lag phase would be a benefit if you were using high risk fruit with high pH, or damaged fruit possibly with a high microbial count.
 

skyfire322

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So I started the wine on Sunday. Nothing really happened until today. In the spec notes of the yeast it says that it's low foam, but when I stirred it I noticed that the bubbles were kind of "chunky" (looked like the consistency of a jam). Is that relatively normal for a low foam yeast? (this is the first time I've used a low foam producing yeast)

I'm also really confused because the sG hasn't changed at all in four days (patience is a virtue) even though it's within the temp range between 60-80 degrees (currently at 71)

0.jpg
 
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