Don't Brush Your Teeth!!

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Tnuscan

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Wow, this explains the sensitivity, with hot and cold, I've been noticing.
Great information, Thanks!
 
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So either I have stop drinking earlier (not gonna happen in this lifetime) or I have to get up in the middle of the night to brush my teeth....at least I'm usually sipping on a dry red, looks like the whites are more corrosive.
 

bkisel

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Good to know. Seems to make sense. The admonition definitely applies to me as I frequently do brush my teeth shortly after my evening glass of wine.

Thanks...
 

Floandgary

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Very interesting but the "other" ad's on the tube insist that once damage is done to tooth enamel (acidic erosion) it is irreversible. Which leads to believe that removing residual corrosives ASAP would be in order! Do Dentists not recommend brushing after every meal??? Or have we been duped by the makers of toothpaste and mouthwash? :?
 
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Finished my wine last night and went to bed w/o brushing my teeth, figuring I'd have to get up to drain off what I drank. Problem was I didn't wake up until my wife got up to get her shower at 4 am. Not doing that again, could have made several sweaters with what was on my teeth. I think I'll just use my wife's sensodyne tp on the nights I have a glass of wine...I might as well go buy a tube.
 

BlueStimulator

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FYI

If you are that worried about your teeth, you should also be worried about your sleep habits. Drinking wine/alcohol right before you go to sleep isn't good for your sleep architecture. So waiting the hour to brush will also help your sleep patterns, because your body will process the alcohol out of your system. As we age our sleep patterns aren't as effective and this can speed up the aging process. Sleep is where our body restores itself and interrupting that isn't a good thing. All that being said there are lots of cardiovascular bennifits to have a glass or two of wine every day. So the conundrum continues
 

sour_grapes

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What is this "tooth brushing" you are all talking about?
no-teeth.jpg
 

JohnT

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Here he is folks, the leader of the plaque!

Check it out. Always makes me crack up!

[ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bOtMizMQ6oM[/ame]
 
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jswordy

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Here's my experience with dentists, after my really good dentist who had made his money retired:

1.) Had a new dentist. He was fixing a tooth or two every time, and I was on 6 month visits. I was like WTF? This was not my prior history. So decided to try another.

2.) So two weeks later, I go to the new dentist, recommended by a friend. She pokes around, comes up and says, "Oh my! You have ELEVEN cavities that must be filled immediately!"

3.) Sigh... So two days later, I am in another dentist's chair for a second opinion. He kept probing me for info about who was the other dentist, what did she say. I says, "Doc, just tell me if you find any cavities." He comes up and says, "I found seven." I says, "Well, she told me eleven.' He says, "Well, I found seven."

4.) I go home and get online, find a book about healing cavities naturally, discuss the weird dentist results with the wife, who is a clinical herbalist. I buy and read the book, which helps but is not the complete answer. We devise a plan that involves a daily K2 complex pill, increased consumption of whole milk (I was drinking practically none; now I drink 12 ounces a day) and some dietary mods. Plus making sure my toothpastes have stannous fluoride, the best form for absorption.

5.) That was almost 5 years ago. I have not been to a dentist since. My teeth are fine.
 

JohnT

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Jim,

I had an experience much like yours. I had this same dentist since I was 5 years old. Great guy, real professional. He did fantastic work and truly cared for his patients.

Well, time goes by and he retires. He ended up selling his practice.

I should have know that something was up when everyone in that office left with the old man. Secretaries, Dental hygienists, etc, all left!

Here is my experience in simply getting a new crown...

At one point, she inflicted so much pain on me that a tear rolled down my cheek. Seeing this, she said "are you crying? gee, I never made a grown man cry before". I would have preferred some novocaine over a stupid comment.

While fitting the crown, she ended up grinding part of the enamel completely off (bare metal exposed at the top). Rather than order a new one, she stuck it in saying "this happens all the time and is perfectly fine". Yeah, right!

Just this week, the crown came loose. The interesting thing is that the crown did not break, it just simply fell off my jaw. I have a number of other crowns (not her work) that are 20+ years old. Not one of them simply fell out!

Well, in the end, I left her for another dentist. I gave my new dentist the info to call and get my dental records. When this happened, I got a nasty phone call from her. She asked me why I left, and I told her. Big mistake. She just went berserk on me.

I believe that this experience make me a justified anit-dentite.. :)
 

wineforfun

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I dread the day my dentist retires(he is 72). Old school guy..........he answers the phone, takes x-rays, cleans, repairs, etc. all himself. No assistants needed. He lets me know, due to my weightlifting, I have some cracks in my teeth but no need to fix, until they deal me a fit. That would not be the case with the younger generation dentists.
We talk about the day he retires and I have to search out a new dentist. I will be seeking his advice as all the newer, younger ones are just trying to pay their mortgage and pay for all their new-fangled equipment by telling you you need root canals, fillings, crowns, etc.
 

mnwc2004

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I work at a dental office :).
Best thing to do is rinse your mouth after drinking acidic drinks. This dilutes the acid. You cannot rebuild enamel but you can (minimally) reharden soft enamel. Once you brush away your enamel it's gone for good.
 

jswordy

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I work at a dental office :).
Best thing to do is rinse your mouth after drinking acidic drinks. This dilutes the acid. You cannot rebuild enamel but you can (minimally) reharden soft enamel. Once you brush away your enamel it's gone for good.

I'm a research writer by trade, so you know I dove into the paperwork before I treated myself! :h

There are a lot of dental schools of thought on enamel. It is not a uniform, solid body of thought. In this region of the country, universities teach that once it is lost, it is gone. So dental care in this region is drill and fill, period. If you find an "advanced" dentist, he or she may also sell you a prescription, high-fluoride toothpaste.

However, there is research that indicates that as long as the caries has not progressed to the point where the enamel is completely removed and underlying dentin is destroyed, enamel can be regenerated.

Also, research shows that if the enamel is perforated to an extent where it cannot be regenerated, but the underlying dentin is intact, the tooth can remineralize. Remineralization is a natural process by which the dentin replaces the lost enamel with a hard mineral layer that is actually harder than the enamel was. The resulting surface is darker that the tooth's enamel but can be whitened for appearance. Once a dentist drills and fills, however, the tubules in the dentin in that area are destroyed and remineralization cannot take place anymore.

Supplementation with K2 complex has been proven in research to aid in teeth healing themselves, and it has been identified in anthropological research as the key factor in why many societies lacking dental procedures none the less have strong teeth that last a lifetime, across a wide variety of diets. High intake of vitamin K complex from food sources was found to be a key to strong, healthy teeth. These studies were begun when it was noticed that caries appeared predominantly to be a problem of modern industrialized societies.

There is also research that seems to indicate that it is the total acidity of the saliva, rather than the acidity of the food eaten, that is key in caries formation. There are pH strips available for saliva testing. Research indicates that saliva pH is key to the types of bacteria present, and the mix of bacterial population has a direct result on caries formation or prevention.

In Britain, a new invention now undergoing human testing aids in naturally healing caries by applying a small electrical current to the tooth. It has already proven itself in animal testing.

Of course, all this is nonsense for some dentists. If I even mention anything but drill and fill to dental professionals here, I am quickly shut down.

I'm sure that's all TMI, for sure. LOL.

But my own experience has been wonderful. I can "feel" my "cavities" with a fingernail, and see them with a dental mirror. But they have been remineralized. So far so good.

I really should go in for a cleaning, but by chewing xylitol gum and carefully brushing and flossing, I've been able to keep things clean. If I do schedule one, I'll make it clear up front that all I want is a cleaning.
 

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