Do Vineyard managers in Latino-america speak english?

Winemaking Talk - Winemaking Forum

Help Support Winemaking Talk - Winemaking Forum:

SunnyGrape

Junior
Joined
Jul 8, 2019
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Hello everyone, it maybe a stupid question but here I go. I’m preparing a trip to Chili and Argentina to present the latest research about heatwaves and its impact in French vine-Brdx region (I work for a french university). I’ll be presenting to a small group of vineyards directors and their team, and i was wondering if I should translate the slides to Spanish or if most of the people working at the industry are english speakers? I don’t want to undermine their knowledge but I do want for them to find the content useful. I believe I speak Spanish [emoji4] but i don’t have the technical idioms. What is your opinion or can you share your experience? Thanks a lot! [emoji120] Btw happy to be part of the forum.
 
Last edited:

Masbustelo

Junior Member
Joined
Jul 18, 2015
Messages
572
Reaction score
140
Location
Northern Illinois 5b
There is no particular reason to think that Vineyard personnel in Chile and Argentina have any degree of fluidity in English. Even if some do, the others won't understand any thing. Better to do your translating ahead of time.
 

SunnyGrape

Junior
Joined
Jul 8, 2019
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
There is no particular reason to think that Vineyard personnel in Chile and Argentina have any degree of fluidity in English. Even if some do, the others won't understand any thing. Better to do your translating ahead of time.
Hello, Thanks a lot for your advice. It helped me a lot. I needed to confirm my suspicions. Again [emoji120] Thank you!
 

Trevor7

Supporting Members
WMT Supporter
Joined
Jul 8, 2017
Messages
239
Reaction score
269
Location
I live in a van by the river
There is a possibility the owner speaks English, but the general vineyard populace probably does not speak fluently, especially with technical terms involved in wine-making.
 

SunnyGrape

Junior
Joined
Jul 8, 2019
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
There is a possibility the owner speaks English, but the general vineyard populace probably does not speak fluently, especially with technical terms involved in wine-making.
Trevor, Thanks so much for your input. Very valuable to me. [emoji120]
 

Lilliant

Junior
Joined
Jun 16, 2021
Messages
1
Reaction score
4
Personally, it was very difficult for me to learn English because I am actually from Romania and when I moved to America, it was very difficult for me to adapt, especially as a child. My parents taught me English classes and that saved me a lot, but I felt I didn't have enough vocabulary. That's why I started looking for other ways and came across a site where you can easily assimilate new vocabulary on different levels. I reached 6th grade vocabulary words and it was already much easier for me to understand and communicate. Obviously, I didn't stop here and I went to the next levels, so now I'm doing very well.
 

JTS84

Supporting Members
WMT Supporter
Joined
Aug 28, 2019
Messages
44
Reaction score
24
Location
Minnesota
Having made many trips to Chile myself - I can tell you that it depends. I have found that at the larger vineyards there is normally someone who speaks English, but at some the smaller ones there is less of a chance. My experience has been that many have someone on staff that speaks English well for marketing, but that isn't necessarily the owner or other staff.

Speaking Spanish there has definitely given me better and more interactive experiences.

Oh, and Spanish in Chile and Spanish in Argentina are not entirely the same although they both understand each other. For example Yo in Chile is pronounced "yoh" but in Argentina "shzo".

Technical terms between the two countries should be the same.

If you ever decide to marry a Chilean you can always switch to speaking in Argentinian/Uruguayan Spanish to annoy them. :)

** I now see that the original post is 2 years old. Oh well, there it is anyhow.
 

Jim Welch

Supporting Members
WMT Supporter
Joined
Feb 25, 2019
Messages
103
Reaction score
140
I work at a port and we import lots and lots of Chliean table grapes and other fruits from roughly mid December until May or even June some years and we have had these accounts since the mid 90's. There are teams of fruit inspectors come in every year to inspect and grade the fruit. This is a very important and prestigious job for them and I've been told it is very competitive to get these jobs.
Very very few speak English well, many speak none, there are some who do so they can interact with port personnel and get around America so I would think that you are likely to see similar rates there.
One thing I'll advise you since you use the term "technical idioms" and English has lots and lots of idioms, be careful translating an idiom. If you can find someone from Chile, or another Spanish speaking South American country, locally to proof read your translations it would behoove you.

Edit: I see this is a necro-posted thread!
 

winemaker81

wine dabbler
WMT Supporter
Joined
Nov 5, 2006
Messages
1,998
Reaction score
3,462
Location
Raleigh, NC, USA
Oh, and Spanish in Chile and Spanish in Argentina are not entirely the same although they both understand each other.
A friend who grew up in Argentina told me the same thing.

It makes sense. A conversation between an American, a Canadian, a Brit, and an Aussie will produce confusion -- 4 peoples separated by a common language!

be careful translating an idiom
Yup! My first employer gave me a list of things to NOT say in certain countries, as it appeared I was going to be traveling internationally. [That fell through. 😞 ]

The word "shag" comes to mind. In the USA it's a type of carpet or a dance. In the UK it's ... well, I suppose we could call it a different kind of dance ...
 

Jim Welch

Supporting Members
WMT Supporter
Joined
Feb 25, 2019
Messages
103
Reaction score
140
A friend who grew up in Argentina told me the same thing.

It makes sense. A conversation between an American, a Canadian, a Brit, and an Aussie will produce confusion -- 4 peoples separated by a common language!


Yup! My first employer gave me a list of things to NOT say in certain countries, as it appeared I was going to be traveling internationally. [That fell through. 😞 ]

The word "shag" comes to mind. In the USA it's a type of carpet or a dance. In the UK it's ... well, I suppose we could call it a different kind of dance ...
Yes indeed, Britsh English-shag: a horizontal dance so to speak!
 
Top