Quantcast

dandelion wine problems

Wine Making Talk

Help Support Wine Making Talk:

alphabetics

Junior
Joined
Apr 26, 2010
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
i searched the forums for a solution to this, but couldn't really find an answer. so, i apologize if this has been answered somewhere before.

last year, i made my first batch of dandelion wine. everything was fine except for the fact that the wine tasted and smelled like rubber. not a burnt rubber like some people talk about, but a legitimate rubber smell (exactly like a rubber band). so, this year i tried it again and the wine has only been fermenting for about two weeks and already smells like rubber. could this have something to do with the flowers themselves? ANY advice at all would really be appreciated. it's such a pain to pick all of those flowers, remove the pedals, and then have the wine come out tasting like a tire.
 

St Allie

Tech Administrator
Joined
Mar 6, 2009
Messages
2,879
Reaction score
14
Hello alpha and welcome to the forum.

can you list your recipe and methodology please?

also what are you fermenting in?.. has the wine been in contact with the bung whilst fermenting? What yeast are you using?

just give us as much info on your process so far, so we can help you with pinpointing the problem..

Allie
 

Wade E

Premium
Joined
Jul 3, 2006
Messages
33,224
Reaction score
268
Are you using a rubber bung tat you only use for this and only this. Ive had people say that some bungs really stink more then others. I havent come across thatrubber smell myself but have only made the Dandt wine once. Is it just a smell or can you taste it also?
 

alphabetics

Junior
Joined
Apr 26, 2010
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
i'll try to answer all of those questions as best i can.

recipe:

2 qts dandelion flowers
3 lbs granulated sugar
4 oranges (juice)
1 gallon water
yeast and nutrient

i picked all of the flowers from a safe location, removed the pedals and cooked them in boiling water. let them sit in a big porcelain pot for about a day and then re-boiled and strained the must into my 1 gallon glass carboy. i added my yeast (some form of champagne yeast. i can't remember the brand) and set the bung. the wine has not touched the rubber bung during any of this process. i don't use any of my equipment for anything else but wine making. i have to admit, i am very new at wine making, but don't think i messed up in doing this.
 

St Allie

Tech Administrator
Joined
Mar 6, 2009
Messages
2,879
Reaction score
14
alpha,

I have never re-boiled the flowers in my flower recipes..( this includes rose petal, elderflower and gorseflowers) flowers are very delicate.. my thoughts are... that the flowers have been over processed. Or a bacteria problem perhaps, ( boiling a must.. usually, but not always, kills bacteria)

secondly..did you add any campden tablets?

where did this recipe come from?

Allie
 

alphabetics

Junior
Joined
Apr 26, 2010
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
i didn't use campden tablets, although i feet i probably should have. the recipe came from somewhere on the internet. i chose it because it was simple. i am not sure why this happened. i suppose i wasn't meant to be a dandelion wine maker.
 

Leanne

Fiesty Winer
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
601
Reaction score
0
i didn't use campden tablets, although i feet i probably should have. the recipe came from somewhere on the internet. i chose it because it was simple. i am not sure why this happened. i suppose i wasn't meant to be a dandelion wine maker.
Don't give up yet. There are some great recipes out there. Search the recipe section here. They are tried and trusted.
 

e-wine

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2009
Messages
180
Reaction score
2
alphabetics,

Your recipe looks like the second recipe down - Dandelion Wine (2)

http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/dandelion.asp

Initially, pour the boiling water over the petals but don't boil the petals twice. When you do bring the petals to a boil, add the peels (none of the white pith) boil for ten minutes and pour/strain into a primary over the sugar, stir to dissolve.

I do agree that the recipe is simple but the procedure leaves a lot of room for error. I have had good luck with Keller's recipes so give it another try. Follow everything verbatim and you should end up with a good wine. And if you have any questions, just let us know. Keep in mind that little things can make a big difference.

e-wine
 

alphabetics

Junior
Joined
Apr 26, 2010
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
thanks for the help everyone. i never expected that boiling the pedals twice could cause this kind of damage. even if this isn't what happened to me, i probably won't do it again. hopefully i can get outside and grab some more dandelions before it's too late and try this again. if not, there's always next year. i appreciate the help from everyone.
 

St Allie

Tech Administrator
Joined
Mar 6, 2009
Messages
2,879
Reaction score
14
these things happen to all of us at some stage alpha..

if it'll make you feel better about trying the next recipe.. you could post it before you start and we'll just have a quick look at it for you next time.

Allie
 

e-wine

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2009
Messages
180
Reaction score
2
alphabetics,

Given the warning about not exceeding 48 hours in Keller's recipe, I believe that is the issue. I also saw a warning in another book about exceeding 48 hours can cause an objectionable odor but they did not elaborate. I know you only let it seep 24 hours but it is usually the relationship of time and temperature that leads to the final result. Higher temperatures equal shorter time. Kinda like food spoilage. Good luck!

e-wine
 
Top