Corks

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WAC4504

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Has anyone used the Premium quality straight corks from Label Peelers? Reason I ask is I just ordered 100 of the #9 x 1 3/4, planning to bottle some wine using a hand corker. They say you should use a floor corker, but I believe at 6'3" and 265# I should be alright, or am I wrong?:ib
 

Johnd

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Has anyone used the Premium quality straight corks from Label Peelers? Reason I ask is I just ordered 100 of the #9 x 1 3/4, planning to bottle some wine using a hand corker. They say you should use a floor corker, but I believe at 6'3" and 265# I should be alright, or am I wrong?:ib
You can get it done, it'll just take a lot more effort, a little more difficult to get them set to just the right depth than with the floor corker.
 

WAC4504

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Thanks John, and have you ever used the corks that have real cork on both ends and agglomerated cork in the middle, they say they're good for up to 10 years.
 

WAC4504

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Well, I just bought a Portuguese floor corker, 59.48 grand total. Now my only question is, what corks are best.
 

Amanda660

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I have the Italian floor corker and use #9 x 1 3/4 corks. I went with the Italian and spent way more $ because I wanted the height & longer handle so I can get the cork in without a struggle (not gonna happen with a hand corker). I'm sure a debate can be waged here but at 5'3"ish the Italian was the way to go for me and I have zero regret.
 

PhilDarby

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be careful if you need to use excessive force in case the neck breaks, resulting in injury, but I recon you should be ok, I used to cork bottles by pushing onto a wall, using a tapered cork, without any corker at all, to be honest, I used to soak the corks for few hours, in water, to make sure they where very soft first though, then slice the top off if they didn't go, fully in, basically it worked for me at the time.

These days I tend to us screw tops and crown caps, but tapered corks still, need less force than a straight one, also, they benefit from soaking in water and storing on their sides, once done, to keep the cork swollen.

ps be weary of bottles with thin and long necks.
 
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Johnd

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Thanks John, and have you ever used the corks that have real cork on both ends and agglomerated cork in the middle, they say they're good for up to 10 years.
Yes, the 1 + 1 corks, they are just fine.
 

Johnd

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Well, I just bought a Portuguese floor corker, 59.48 grand total. Now my only question is, what corks are best.
That's kind of a loaded question, because it depends upon what your goals are for your wines, as well as your budget. Making a bunch of cheap quickdrinking kits, get some agglomerate corks. Making wine from grapes that you intend to age a long time, invest in some better corks.

I am of the latter group and use corks from Lafitte, they're all natural cork, mid grade, #9 x 1-3/4" for all of my wine. I keep agglomerate corks around too, use em for some of my quickie stuff, to cork wines for barrel topping, etc.
 

richmke

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Well, I just bought a Portuguese floor corker, 59.48 grand total. Now my only question is, what corks are best.
With natural cork, you run the risk of Cork Taint.

Since you now have a floor corker, use only #9 cork. They are bigger (wider) than #7 and #8, and thus give a tighter seal.

Label Peelers says:
Bottling Corks. Natural corks to Aglica polymer and even synthetic corks for long term storage. This range of quality corks has something to meet the needs of everyone.

Below is listed the styles of corks we offer and their storage length so you can find the cork that suits your needs the best.

First Quality Corks - 1-2 Year Storage ($9.82/100)

Premium Quality Corks - 4-6 Year Storage ($15.60/100)

NomaCorks - 10+ Year Storage ($18.53/100)

Aglica Corks - 12-18 Month Storage ($14.95/100)
NomaCorks are synthetic, and have the least risk of cork taint.

IMHO, buy the best cork (other than the finest natural cork, which can be really expensive). The cost difference is negligible.

I use NomaCorks. I bought 1,000 for around $100, and split them with someone local. Since they are synthetic, I don't worry about them drying out while they sit waiting to be used. I will give them a short dunk in sanitizing solution prior to usage. Not for lubrication, but just in case, since the sterile bag they were in was opened.

However, there are threads about the Portuguese floor corker not playing nice with synthetic corks. Some of them leave a score in the cork. Buy a bag of 30 Nomacorc for $6, and see how it works in yours.


If you are really into natural cork, places like the following have various grades: First, Super, Extra, and Flor. With First being $53/100, and Flor being $102/100. Like I said, really expensive.

http://www.widgetco.com/natural-wine-corks

There was one place that sold "extras", which are corks imprinted with a winery's logo. Those were relatively inexpensive.

With natural cork, only buy what you can use within a few months. They dry out if not used promptly.
 
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Boatboy24

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That's kind of a loaded question, because it depends upon what your goals are for your wines, as well as your budget. Making a bunch of cheap quickdrinking kits, get some agglomerate corks. Making wine from grapes that you intend to age a long time, invest in some better corks.

I am of the latter group and use corks from Lafitte, they're all natural cork, mid grade, #9 x 1-3/4" for all of my wine. I keep agglomerate corks around too, use em for some of my quickie stuff, to cork wines for barrel topping, etc.
I also use corks from Lafitte. The 'Agglo 1+1'. Purchased in bulk, they are very reasonable, and I even get my logo printed on them.
 

Johnd

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I also use corks from Lafitte. The 'Agglo 1+1'. Purchased in bulk, they are very reasonable, and I even get my logo printed on them.
I really like them as well, got the logo printed on the Extra First corks, in bulk they were 33 cents apiece, not too bad considering the quality............ Great company, easy to work with, prompt service and shipping, high marks from me.
 

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