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From Techniques in Home Wine Making it says Potassium & sodium metabisulfite are the most widely used & most effective sanitizing agents for winemaking applications. I can't shake a glass carboy for 10 minutes, I am going to rinse, walk away, come back rinse again. I think this should work too.
Common yes, although I have no clue if it's the most effective.

No need to shake the carboy. Add K-meta water, swirl it around, drain the carboy, then let it set for 10 minute. The K-meta evaporates, producing gaseous SO2.
 

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Common yes, although I have no clue if it's the most effective.

No need to shake the carboy. Add K-meta water, swirl it around, drain the carboy, then let it set for 10 minute. The K-meta evaporates, producing gaseous SO2.
Thanks, was a little worried that I might not have a clean process.
 

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Hello again,
Update on my wild grape wine. I started this batch on 12-19-21, sg 1.09. My sg readings by day were 20th 1.08, 21st 1.07, 22nd 1.058 , 23rd 1.05, 24th 1.05, 25th 1.044, 26th 1.04, 27th 1.036.
 

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Oops, new computer, not used to keyboard. To continue, at this point I was a little worried about a stuck fermentation. To this point I had the must in a bucket fermentator with a cloth over the top. I decided to put it under an airlock with some advice from my wine making friends, did this, got busy with the holidays. I noticed that I had significant bubbling taking place. Today I measured my sg and I believe that I am done with the fermentation. I have three separate containers as I didn't have enough for the sizes of carboys that I have. So my readings are, .998, .994, & 1.02. I noticed a significant amount of gross lees in the bottom of the carboys. I tasted the wine & it has a bitter taste followed by the sweet taste. I imagine that might be the SO2? Upon moving the carboys to get my readings I did notice a lot of gas bubbling up. My questions at this time is, do I rack? Do you rack a couple of times before you Degas?
Thanks for the help, I am excited that I didn't have a stuck fermentation. I wanted to get through at least one batch before I run into too many issues.
 
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I noticed a significant amount of gross lees in the bottom of the carboys. I tasted the wine & it has a bitter taste followed by the sweet taste. I imagine that might be the SO2?
Probably CO2. At this stage wine is going through continuous chemical changes, so don't expect it to taste good.

If you have a heavy build up of gross lees, it's time to rack. Then degas. Some sediment will be held in suspension by the excess CO2, so the wine probably won't clear fully until it's degassed (manually or naturally).
 

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Probably CO2. At this stage wine is going through continuous chemical changes, so don't expect it to taste good.

If you have a heavy build up of gross lees, it's time to rack. Then degas. Some sediment will be held in suspension by the excess CO2, so the wine probably won't clear fully until it's degassed (manually or naturally).
Ok, I will do the racking. I might wait a day as the lees got stirred up a bit today. Old Corker mentioned in a post that he likes to leave a little CO2 on the wine to protect it while it's clearing. If I wait to do the degassing, would it be a good time to do the cold stabilization?
 

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Ok, I will do the racking. I might wait a day as the lees got stirred up a bit today. Old Corker mentioned in a post that he likes to leave a little CO2 on the wine to protect it while it's clearing. If I wait to do the degassing, would it be a good time to do the cold stabilization?
I've been doing some reading on the site today and found Chuck D's discussion of his wild grape wine. It seems like I might be trying to achieve a taste that I might not get as the grapes are better blended with other fruits to make a good tasting wine. Two thoughts here, has anyone fermented two different fruits together? Or do you just plan on the blending later? Also, what about MLF, is this something that might improve my wine at this point. I do not have any culture at home to do this. I believe that I have read you can buy either a dry version or a hydrated one?
 
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If I wait to do the degassing, would it be a good time to do the cold stabilization?
I would do the cold stabilization after degassing, as any sediment in suspension is more likely to drop with the tartrate crystals. Clearing is a side benefit of cold stabilization.

You can ferment ANYTHING together, and/or you can blend post-fermentation.

MLF will help if some of the excess acid is malic. MLF converts malic to lactic, but if there is no malic present, there's nothing to convert.
 

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I would do the cold stabilization after degassing, as any sediment in suspension is more likely to drop with the tartrate crystals. Clearing is a side benefit of cold stabilization.

You can ferment ANYTHING together, and/or you can blend post-fermentation.

MLF will help if some of the excess acid is malic. MLF converts malic to lactic, but if there is no malic present, there's nothing to convert.
Thanks winemaker81! I will do the degassing then cold stabilization.
 

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This is a super informative thread. I do read books and articles on winemaking, and that is a great starting point. But much like an engineering student with limited work experience, it's tough to apply what you've learned until you actually work in the field (or make some wine). As I gain experience and veer away from straight-up kit making, I like to use this forum to ask questions that give me general, rule-of-thumb answers (hoping other newbies learn too). This allows me to plow ahead with some confidence, benefitting from the experience of others. It's also nice to get more than one viewpoint, as many books provide you just one viewpoint. So much for the fluff...

I was browsing at my local Wine Supply Shop yesterday and I noticed that L.D. Carlson makes several yeast additives, specifically Yeast Starter, Yeast Energizer and Yeast Nutrient (all side-by-side on the shelf). I've seen some of these used in various recipes but have never needed them before. So, my question is, under what circumstances might I need/use each of these items? Thank you, in advance, for sharing your knowledge and experience.
:f
 
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Yeast Starter, Yeast Energizer and Yeast Nutrient
Yeast starter is used to get a yeast colony growing, and it's generally a good idea to use it.

Nutrient ensures the yeast has everything it needs to prosper. I always use nutrient, as low nutrient can stress the yeast and produce H2S, which is bad. Energizer is used to boost yeast, and in restarting stuck fermentations.
 

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The real driver behind this question is that I've made lots of kits where I pitched dry yeast, but the other day I made my first FWK starter bottle. I'm now thinking I should make this a standard practice (even with WE kits). I don't know exactly what's in FWK "Packet B" but I'm guessing nutrient and energizer.
 
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The real driver behind this question is that I've made lots of kits where I pitched dry yeast, but the other day I made my first FWK starter bottle. I'm now thinking I should make this a standard practice (even with WE kits). I don't know exactly what's in FWK "Packet B" but I'm guessing nutrient and energizer.
I've tried different pitching methods, but since my first FWK last August, an overnight starter is now my SOP.
 

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I've tried different pitching methods, but since my first FWK last August, an overnight starter is now my SOP.
Aha! I see from your website that you're using yeast nutrient and sugar in the overnight starter. Is the sugar an appetizer before the meal? I'll give this a try if it's been working well for you.
 

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Aha! I see from your website that you're using yeast nutrient and sugar in the overnight starter. Is the sugar an appetizer before the meal? I'll give this a try if it's been working well for you.
The FWK kits come with a packet to be used in starting the yeast. The packet contains yeast nutrient (diammonium phosphate or DAP) and extra fine sugar. The instructions say to make up the yeast mixture 18 to 30 hours before pitching.
 

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The FWK kits come with a packet to be used in starting the yeast. The packet contains yeast nutrient (diammonium phosphate or DAP) and extra fine sugar. The instructions say to make up the yeast mixture 18 to 30 hours before pitching.
Double aha! Thanks Rocky, this is good info. There is also a "Packet C" which is the 2nd dose of yeast nutrient, per the instructions.
 
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Aha! I see from your website that you're using yeast nutrient and sugar in the overnight starter. Is the sugar an appetizer before the meal? I'll give this a try if it's been working well for you.
Sugar is essentially an appetizer.

I started a thread titled Rapid Ferment in Kit Winemaking, as the very rapid ferment was outside my experience and initially freaked me. The conversation may be useful to read through.

At this time, I'm ok with the rapid ferment, and am on board with Extended Maceration of fruit pulp, to a point.
 

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I started a thread titled Rapid Ferment in Kit Winemaking,
Most excellent! I read through this thread and it was super helpful. I'm now kinda scared to add "Packet C", but it should be fun! My bucket looks like I put some Pop Rocks in there, but it smells really good. I'm just following the kit directions, as my sophistication level is low, but this is an exciting learning experience for me. Since I need to go into the office for a couple days, I'll be leaving my wife home with the Ferm Monster. Can't wait to get that phone call...

Going back to my original question... I see how to use commercial Yeast Nutrient now. It seems like using the overnight starter method may mean that I never need the commercial Yeast Starter. And if stuck fermentation is not a problem, under what circumstances would I use the commercial Yeast Energizer? Still a little fuzzy here. Is this more appropriate for citrus fruit wines? Should I stop beating this topic to death? Thanks.
 

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