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Commercial Simple Syrup?

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ericsmithcpa

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Is there any reason not to use a commercial simple syrup? I see most people make their own with water and sugar, but that seems like a hassle, and I'm not trying to annoy my wife by taking over the kitchen lol.

It's less than $5 for a 12 oz bottle. It would sure be "simple" to pour two bottles of this in the fermenter and be done. 14 grams of sugar per 30 ML (about 50/50). But it has lactic acid as a preservative, and I don't know how much... would that give anyone pause?

https://www.heb.com/product-detail/stirrings-simple-syrup/1715019
 

Brettanomyces

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I'm sure that would work just fine. It's very expensive for what it is, but if it's worth it to you, go right ahead.

For what it's worth, making simple syrup doesn't exactly take over the kitchen. One pot and about 5 minutes is all it takes. Make it while the wife is sleeping - and clean the pot! - and she won't even know.
 

DIYer

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Agree with the cost. Jeez, for $5, you can probably buy enough sugar to make a gallon or more of simple syrup at home. I even do it in the microwave in a 4-cup Pyrex measuring cup. Heat the water to boiling. Add the sugar and stir. Heat again until boiling.
 

Scooter68

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Suggest you look at this article: https://ezinearticles.com/?Wine-Making-With-Invert-Sugar&id=368202 - I might help you make an enlightened decision. There may be an advantage to that commercial simple Syrup IF it is in fact supplying you with an Invert sugar.

I'm not going to try to provide a scholarly rationale but before you go in either direction you might do well to read this article:https://thebakingsheet.net/why-should-i-use-invert-sugar-in-my-home-winemaking/

At the current price of sugar and the ease with which you can make a simple syrup yourself (And go one step further to make it an invert simple syrup) I would agree with making it yourself. It's not messy nor does it take that long and should go ahead and 'invert' the sugar even better.

As with so many topics in wine making there are a number of rationales that can be used to answer your question as you've already in these responses. Basically just making a simply syrup without 'inverting' the sugar is WAY cheaper than that commercial simple syrup but it comes down to money invested vs time to do it yourself.
 

Brettanomyces

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If you're worried about yeast breaking down disaccharides, pick up dextrose. Found at any brew store, and not much more expensive than sucrose.
 

Scooter68

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Think OP's question was is there a reason NOT to use a commercially made "Simple Syrup"

Best reason I can think of is Cost. BUT if the commercial product is a invert sugar, then there might be a very small advantage if used for back-sweetening. Not sure of any other reason other than his concern about the time and effort for a DIY Simple Syrup(SS).

The price is for a little less than what I get from a 2:1 mix. I usually end up with about 20-22oz of SS using 2 cups sugar and one cup water.

Last time I bought a 4 lb bag of sugar (Equals about 9 cups) I paid about $2.20 I think so.... That's less than $.30 for the same amount of home made SS.
 
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Intheswamp

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Just a trivia note... The 2:1 sugar/water SS mix is the same mix used in the fall/autumn for feeding honey bees who are low on stored honey going into the winter...this ratio approximates the viscosity and sugar content of honey and is easily stored by the bees. If in the spring a honey bee colony is found to be struggling or it is a new colony being formed from a nuc a 1:1 ratio is usually used...it's closer to the characteristics of nectar and stimulates cell-building and brood creation. Naturally, if the colony is making honey you do not feed. FWIW. :rolleyes:
 
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